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The Mallee Fowl


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The ABC has run a great story about the Mallee Fowl in NW Victoria. They're interviewing an old local farmer who has been taking an interest in the local Mallee Fowl, for what appears to be nearly all his life.

His knowledge of the birds behaviour and activities is substantial - and in all the years I was working around the W.A. Wheatbelt, and came across hundreds of Mallee Fowl nests, I never saw a single Mallee Fowl as quiet and unafraid of humans, as the pair this old bloke has made friends with.

In the W.A. Wheatbelt, they're an exceptionally flighty bird, and will take to their heels or fly, as soon as you spot them from anything under 100M away.

The foxes kill them on a huge basis, and their numbers in W.A. are only a fraction of what they were, even as little as 40 years ago.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-16/victorian-endangered-twice-widowed-malleefowl-finds-new-mate/101238704

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I wonder if the Greens would ever consider support the idea of putting a bounty on feral carnivores and omnivores in order to protect our unique avian and mammalian fauna? Or do they hold all life sacred, no matter what devastation the ferals cause? 

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You'd need to keep the payout down to about 5c a scalp or the payout would be enormous. I STR the numbers of feral cats alone in Australia could be as high as 6M.

The fox numbers aren't far behind. The locals in a small town down South in W.A. had a 3-day, long weekend fox shoot a few years ago, they invited in anyone who wanted to have a shootup.

I recall there were about 60 shooters spotlighting in vehicles only within a few kms of the town, and they nailed over 800 foxes in that 3 day period.

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Welling NZ.

A farmer lost lots of lambs to feral dogs, and put out a message for all shooters to come & clear his property.

BUT

The police stopped that, then he somehow got the army in, who took out 30 dogs in one shoot.

 Most were pets !. Who,s owner's had sworn that their pets weren't the problem.

I have Never heard of a ' feral Cat ', attacking people. Like you hear of ' dog attacks '.

My,soninlaw has a Husky,  but the neighbors dog jumped over his fence & bit him hard.

Three days off work, 

AND

the neighbor denied it could have been his dog, ( cross bred Bull Terrier  ).

" now there,s an AXE awaiting the dogs next visit "!.

the owner might be happy with the outcome of taking that dog ' home ' in a bag.

spacesailor

 

 

 

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Thoughtless management of pets in general and dogs in particular must be the root cause of lots of neighbourhood discord.
 

I fell out with the lady next door over her little yappy pooch. She’d leave for work at 5am and the mongrel thing would then bark continuously for hours. I was studying for my Masters at the time, on top of a stressful job and community committments, so would rarely get to bed before 2am. She fobbed off my polite requests, unable to believe her little gem guilty.  One morning, totally sleep deprived, I did my block and chased the mongrel around her yard, pelting it with oranges off her tree. That resulted in angy accusations and claims for vet. bills. 

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Our dog is like that, but he lives in the house, only going out on a lead. He is my daughter's dog, and she is afraid the neighbours Rottweiler cross bitch, who has jumped the 6'6" fence into our yard, will tear him apart.

 

My daughter's 3 year old male cats, which have never been outside for the same reason, love to tease the dog, climbing on anything above his reach, causing him to bark and get into trouble. He has the loudest,sharpest bark. Then one of the cats will come down and fight with him, or sit just out of his reach and swipe him with a paw. And he barks and whimpers when she leaves the house to do her School Crossing Supervisor duties.  

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I had a holiday in India years ago and the dog problem there was so bad that I kicked every dog I found asleep in the daytime, to get my own back for the barking at night.

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Yes OT, air starters sure are a favoured weapon of the practical joker. I have a neighbour who spends most of his life operating machines and the bastard loves nothing more than sneaking up behind my while, with earmuff on, I’m wizzing the grass on my driveway.

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12 hours ago, Old Koreelah said:

Yes OT, air starters sure are a favoured weapon of the practical joker. I have a neighbour who spends most of his life operating machines and the bastard loves nothing more than sneaking up behind my while, with earmuff on, I’m wizzing the grass on my driveway.

That could be dangerous, he might get wet when you jump and spin around.  By the way you forgot the "on" in the last sentence.

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7 hours ago, facthunter said:

Professional comedians all suffer from acute depression.  That's not funny. Nev

That's possibly because they're (mostly) highly intelligent and observant people who the world as it is.

 

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 Today anyone who is not depressed must be ON something to disconnect  them from reality. Papers etc only print BAD stuff and adverts make you feel  you HAVE to buy stuff you can't afford in order to be happy..  Why would you feel happy, unless you can get away from the $#1T? Nev

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Off topic, but I think the lifestyle I had as a kid was beneficial, we were outside, fishing, biking, hunting for dinner, helping in yard, at shearing sheds and in general not stuck inside with headphones on and a device in our face.

We weren’t being told we had to wear certain things, not having to belong to the rainbow alphabet crowd to fit in.

I don’t recall every one being depressed then. Even though we didn’t have a lot, life was good. 32 CM tv in lounge room, full bellies of homemade food, dad made sure we had a roof over our heads and good schooling.

I think some of these cases of depression are self inflicted by modern lifestyle.

just think if we had a WW2 situation nowadays, I don’t think the young people would or could step up like they did back then, we have become too soft as a society 

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I lament not being brought up on a farm or similar setting. I was lucky enought to go to a private school in Melbourne for a couple of years that had a Dairy farm not too far out. I was in year 8, when I first went, and it was a revalation. I loved it so much, I went back in the holdiays to help out (different times then). In year 9, I couldn't wait for our "camp" to the farm and really enjoyed everythign farm life offered. Sadly, I finished at the end of year 9. And city life and getting an urban/city job, as well as girls took over.

 

Fast forward 30 years, and I finally had a small holding over here.. Sadly, the much better half was not cut out for it despite growing up in a rural village - three years of great fun for me, but when we lost some chickens to foxes, it was too much for her as she treated them like pets. For me, it was off to the local battery hen farm, to pick up the rejected layers at £1 each.. After two weeks, they had their plumes back, and were each laying an egg a day. But, the loss had sewn the seeds and now we run an Air BnB in a small village. I prefer the sheep, ducks and chickens.

 

Edited by Jerry_Atrick
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4 hours ago, Jerry_Atrick said:

it was off to the local battery hen farm, to pick up the rejected layers at £1 each.. After two weeks, they had their plumes back, and were each laying an egg a day…

What applies to animals crowded into feedlots also applies to us humans: the more we are isolated from nature, the sicker we become. There have been several projects to rehabilitate stuffed-up humans with big doses of nature and animals and the results have been inspirational. I have a family member who has battled The Black Dog for decades; I’d love to put him to work in some remote project.

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