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  1. The things we take for granted. The Russians have been pushed back from around Kharkiv city, and in the north, Ukrainian troops have reached the border and planted a symbolic border marker post. So for the time being, the air raid sirens have gone silent in the city. Alexander K. spent three hours in the kitchen at 2.00am this morning cooking soup; the first chance to slow cook since the war began. Until now, it's been come up out of the basement, cook a quick meal, then take it back down to the basement. He's not fighting on the front line and is doing volunteer work around town, feeding the elderly, running shuttles for people evacuating and a million other things. A lot of the younger people (women and children) have evacuated to the west, but a lot of the elderly have been left behind. Many are too infirm to travel, some are isolated and have no relatives, and others simply don't have the money to go anywhere else. That's where people like Alexander and his friends come into the picture. He's used what he could of his own money to buy food and medicines for the old people, and now relies on donations from people through social media networks. During the day, he has been running the gauntlet driving around to the old people. When the shelling started in Kharkiv, Alexander and his wife were hosting several families in their basement come air raid shelter. High morale and strong spirit has got them through it so far. I was pleased to hear that his wife and little daughter were recently able to evacuate to the west, as they were there through a lot of the hostilities. I'll think of them next time I make soup in my very peaceful kitchen. We are so lucky to live in a country like Australia. P.S. it's mushroom and barley soup with goat cheese on top. It looks good; I'll have to get his recipe.
    8 points
  2. One thing that should be either scrapped or further defined is Standing Order 80 80 Closure of a Member speaking: If a Member is speaking, other than when giving a notice of motion or moving the terms of a motion, another Member may move— That the Member be no longer heard. The question must be put immediately and resolved without amendment or debate. https://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/House_of_Representatives/Powers_practice_and_procedure/House_of_Representatives_Standing_Orders It appears that the Standing Order was introduced as a means to curtail a Member from filibustering and wasting the Parliament's time for conducting its business. The Morrison Government has made a welter of this Standing Order to shut down opposition and cross bench members in this past term. It has used it so often that, since it holds the majority in the house, the Speaker now doesn't even call for a vote. The motion is simply passed.
    7 points
  3. The Great Myth perpetuated by conservative media is that the Liberal National COALition are better managers of our economy. The LNP have been the worst at selling off our assets, increasing our national debt and allowing foreign corporations to rape our land without paying taxes.
    7 points
  4. Why? The Labor Party, for all its faults otherwise, has been the Party that has introduced more legislation that has been of benefit to Joe Blow than the Conservatives ever have. The Conservatives would have us still working 48 hours per week, paying through the nose for health insurance and having no superannuation and a host of other social security benefits. 1908: Introduction of old age and invalid pensions - Andrew Fisher (Labor) 1912: introduction of a maternity allowance - Andrew Fisher (Labor) 1927: Family Endowment Act (NSW) - Jack Lang (Labor) 1941: Family endowment was replaced by the Commonwealth child endowment system. 1945: introduction of unemployment and sickness benefits - Curtin/Chifley (Labor) Universal Health Insurance 1975: The first iteration of Medicare was called Medibank, and it was introduced by the Whitlam government early in its second term. The federal opposition under Malcolm Fraser had rejected Bills relating to its financing, which is why it took the government so long to get it established. Medibank began on 1 July 1975 after the passing of legislation by a joint sitting of Parliament on 7 August 1974. It had only a short period of operation before the Whitlam government was dismissed. The incoming Fraser government modified Medibank, establishing a levy of 2.5% on income to fund it. Interestingly, the levy was higher than that proposed by the Whitlam government and which the Coalition had blocked while in opposition. Superannuation 1992: The Superannuation Guarantee (SG) is introduced by the Keating Labor Government, with a mandatory 3 per cent contribution rate (or 4 per cent for employers with an annual payroll above $1 million), requiring employers to make a contribution into a super fund on their employees’ behalf. Superannuation assets at the time are estimated to be $148bn. 1993: The World Bank endorses Australia’s ‘three pillar’ system: compulsory superannuation, the age pension, and voluntary retirement savings, as world’s best practice for the provision of retirement income. Much is made by the Conservatives of the spending of money by Labor governments. This forms the basis of their attacks on Labor's economic management ability. Labor might spend money on sun shades for school children everywhere, but doesn't allocate it to car parks for non-existent commuter hubs. The people might have killed off the idea of a bunyip aristocracy in 1853, but the robber barons still rule.
    7 points
  5. Easy now, he only lost one post, not thousands...
    6 points
  6. My old Italian neighbour Barney is 91, and his understanding of English, and his reading of English is pretty poor. He struggles to understand most letters he gets in the mail, and often asks me what they are saying. He often gets a wrong idea of what the letter means, so I have to sort it out for him. He lives alone after his Australian-born wife died about 10 years ago at age 84. I'm sure Barney only got this far because of his wifes reading and comprehension abilities. I seriously doubt whether Barney understands the instructions on all official voting material - yet he's been in Australia since 1949 (he was 18 when he arrived as a Displaced Person from war-torn Europe) and he's worked continuously all his working life. However, he spent the largest portion of his working life as a gardener at Parliament House (BS House, he calls it!). He told me he trained in a bakery, but I reckon he never qualified as a Baker because he could never do the written exam for becoming a Baker. Despite all that, he's an exemplary immigrant who has never been in trouble, and he would have contributed a lot to the country in his lifetime.
    6 points
  7. There is a vast difference mining materials that can then produce cleaner and sustainable power production and then be recycled and coal which is burnt once and also produces harmful by products. Mining will probably always be a part of human existence. What we do mine has to be done sustainably, not just dig it up and burn it
    6 points
  8. A woman takes a lover during the day, while her husband is at work – not aware that her 9-year-old son is hiding in the closet. Her husband comes home unexpectedly, so she hides her lover in the closet. The boy now has company. “Dark in here,” the boy whispers. “Yes, it is,” the man replies awkwardly. “I have a baseball. Want to buy it?” “No, thanks.” “My dad’s outside.” “Okay, how much?” “$250.” A few weeks later, the same thing happens, and the boy and the mom’s lover find themselves in the closet together. “Dark in here.” “Yes, it is.” “I have a baseball glove. Want to buy it?” “No, thanks.” “I’ll tell.” “How much?” “$750.” A few days later, the father says to the boy, “Grab your glove. Let’s go outside and toss the baseball!” “I can’t,” the boy replies. “I sold them.” “How much did you sell them for?” the dad asks. “$1,000,” the boy proudly announces. “That’s terrible to overcharge your friends like that,” the father says, shocked. “That is way more than those two things cost. I’m going to take you to church and make you confess.” At church that Sunday, the father alerts the priest, makes his child sit in the confession booth, and closes the door. “Dark in here,” the boy says. The priest replies, “Don’t start that sh*t again.”
    6 points
  9. When I was young, I was extremely poor; however, after many years of hard work, I am no longer young.
    6 points
  10. I doubt that Trump would have cared. He would be more likely to say "Ukraine! I should never have given them all that money! What have they ever done for me? That clown Zelensky couldn't even find any dirt on Hunter Biden. Putin can do whatever he likes. He told me Ukraine was always part of Russia anyway and belongs to him, and I believe him. And who needs NATO, anyway? They've been ripping us off for years, and now they want to give all their weapons to Ukraine for free. They're a bunch of idiots. America First!"
    6 points
  11. While walking down the street one day a Member of Parliament is tragically hit by a truck and dies. His soul arrives in heaven and is met by St. Peter at the entrance. 'Welcome to heaven,' says St. Peter. 'Before you settle in, it seems there is a problem. We seldom see a high official around these parts, you see, so we're not sure what to do with you.' 'No problem, just let me in,' says the man. 'Well, I'd like to, but I have orders from higher up. What we'll do is have you spend one day in hell and one in heaven. Then you can choose where to spend eternity.' 'Really, I've made up my mind. I want to be in heaven,' says the MP. 'I'm sorry, but we have our rules.' And with that, St. Peter escorts him to the elevator and he went down, down, down to hell. The doors open and he found himself in the middle of a green golf course. In the distance is a clubhouse and standing in front of it are all his friends and other politicians who had worked with him. Everyone is very happy and dressed in evening dress. They run to greet him, shake his hand, and reminisce about the good times they had while getting rich at the expense of the people. They played a friendly game of golf and then dined on lobster, caviar and champagne Also present is the devil, who really is a very friendly & nice guy who has a good time dancing and telling jokes. They are having such a good time that before he realizes it's time to go. Everyone gives him a hearty farewell and wave whilst the elevator rises.... The elevator rises and the door opens in heaven where St. Peter is waiting for him. 'Now it's time to visit heaven. 24 hours pass with the MP joining a group of contented souls moving from cloud to cloud, playing the harp and singing. They have a good time and, before he realizes it, the 24 hours have gone by and St. Peter returns. 'Well, then, you've spent a day in hell and another in heaven. Now choose your eternity.' The MP reflects for a minute, then he answers: 'Well, I would never have said it before, I mean heaven has been delightful, but I think I would be better off in hell.' So St. Peter escorts him to the elevator and he goes down, down, down to hell. When the doors open he's in the middle of a barren land covered with waste and garbage. He sees all his friends, dressed in rags, picking up the trash and putting it in black bags as more trash falls from above. The devil comes over to him and puts his arm around his shoulder. ‘I don't understand,' stammers the MP. 'Yesterday I was here and there was a golf course and clubhouse, and we ate lobster and caviar, drank champagne, danced and had a great time. Now there's just a wasteland full of garbage and my friends look miserable. What happened? The devil looks at him, smiles and says, 'Yesterday we were campaigning - Today you voted’.
    5 points
  12. Have a care when you suggest that there are dirty links between "police" and the Government. Those dirty links are only between those in the upper echelons of both police and politicians. Those who have been there know that in the Police, the slag rises to the top. The good stuff is at lower levels.
    5 points
  13. Putin has no personal military training or experience, and that is now showing. He's reliant on a small circle of close, trusted aides. None of those aides have been picked because of their military and strategic skills - they've been picked because they're Yes-men, and because they're loyal to Putin, and he thinks he can trust them. Putin is a trained spy, that's all. He studied and qualified in Law. He's a master of deceit and psychological underhand warfare - but that's about all. He attained the rank of Lt Colonel in the KGB - but that rank only imitates real military rank. A proper Lt Colonel in the military has training in a multitude of warfare tactics, strategy, and soldier-management. Putin lacks that ability to understand how a military force operates, and what strategies are needed to win. He (or his "trusted" underlings) failed to ensure the logistics of the Russian military were up to speed. To keep 1 soldier in the field, you need about 7 soldiers behind him - supplying fuel, food, ammunition, spare parts, ordnance of every type - from clothing to tents - in a timely and adequate manner. We saw how the Russians ran out of fuel, ran out of food, ran low on ammunition, ran out of tyres, ran out of mechanical repair backup. Military Engineers are crucial to an Army's operation. They are the ones working alongside the infantry - not only fighting, but doing pioneering and engineering work - de-mining and laying mines - carrying out demolition that destroys the enemys ability to move, or gain access to supplies - carrying out rapid replacement of destroyed infrastructure, such as bridges and other vital infrastructure that keeps an Army moving. I haven't seen Russian military engineers out and about, in the level of force they should be in. In WW2, Allied Engineers landed on enemy held territory, at the front, alongside the Infantry, with their engineer and construction equipment. In Italy in WW2, U.S. Engineers built an airstrip capable of taking B-17's within 3 days of the landing in Italy. I have seen nothing that shows me Russian military engineers carrying out repair work to damaged infrastructure that is stopping Russian military movement. In one action, the Ukrainians waited until all the Russians had crossed a vital bridge, then blew it up, trapping the Russians - which they then massacred. A good Engineer force would have been right there with the Infantry, and either rapidly repairing the bridge, to enable a retreat - or pontooning equipment back across the waterway. The Russian military has reportedly reduced the number of NCO's in their Army. NCO's are your corporals and sergeants that train the bottom-rung soldier - and lead them and guide them when the fighting starts. As a result, it appears basic soldier training in the Russian Army is not up to the level of other military forces. The Russians deluded themselves that it was, and that they had a world-class fighting force. The evidence has shown otherwise. Even more importantly, it appears no-one has placed any importance on troop morale in the Russian Army. Soldier morale is crucial to the success of a fighting force. In every war fought by the Allies, huge importance was placed on sustaining and raising troop morale - particularly when the troops are a long way from home, and are not sure when they will see loved ones again - if ever. But most importantly, Putin has no understanding of co-ordinating the three forces - the Army, the Air Force and the Navy, to work together to achieve a clearly-defined set of objectives. He should have studied up on Gen. John Monash, not Law. General Monash was the first to understand the crucial importance of smooth co-ordination of all arms of the military - the timing of artillery strikes, the co-ordination of infantry and armour - the co-ordination of airstrikes to aid infantry - and the importance of solid lines of rapid, secure, unobstructed communication. Gen. Monash understood this in 1917, and won every battle action he led, from the Battle of Hamel in July 1917, right through to the end of WW1. It's been said that WW1 would have shortened to a couple of years if Gen Monash had been placed in overall charge from Day One. The Battle of Hamel is called "the textbook victory". It was run like clockwork and timed to perfection. Monash timed the action to take 90 minutes to achieve its objectives - the Battle achieved all objectives with stunning success, and low Allied losses - and it took 93 minutes. Russia failed from the word go, to achieve air superiority, and to neutralise the Ukrainian Air Force. It failed to ensure logistics were up to the needs and speed of its military, it failed to properly co-ordinate all the arms of the military to ensure an effective multi-pronged assault. Russian forces obviously thought they could copy Hitlers "Blitzkreig", and use speed and awe and weaponry to overrun a weak, disjointed nation. The Russians stretched their supply lines too long, a fatal mistake - and whereas Hitler could pilfer fuel supplies and food on a large scale to continue from Germany to the coast of France - the Russians seem to have failed to grasp the vast distances in the Ukraine, failed to understand that the Ukrainian nation was capable of huge resistance, and effective fightback - and there were no easy pickings in the Ukraine, as regards logistical supplies to keep going. Modern warfare technology has handed the advantage to small nimble forces armed with modern technology. Guerrilla warfare has always been a satisfactory way to beat a larger force, but the Ukrainians have taken it to a new level. And of course, the Russians failed to appreciate the level of assistance the Ukrainians would get, and are getting, from the West and NATO nations. https://www.salon.com/2022/05/10/has-been-beaten-this-military-expert-says-that-moment-is-coming-soon/
    5 points
  14. I miss the energy I once had.
    5 points
  15. There's a very good reason for that. The officials have to account for every ballot paper issued at a polling booth. What if a lost ballot paper was a legitimate vote and by not counting it, the ballot for that Seat ended up in a draw? It would take months to confirm that all votes and redistributed votes had been correctly accounted for, and that accounting was agreed to by the two candidates as being totally correct and that there was no disagreement with the AEEC's published result. Then you'd have to run the election for that seat all over again, and you and I would have to foot the bill. So, throwing a ballot into the waste paper bin is a highly irresponsible thing to do. If a person has no interest in voting, at least assist by having their name marked as attending, then simply fold the paper and put it in the ballot box, unmarked. It won't count for a vote for anyone. Alternatively, if a person not want to participate in our democracy, the gates are always open to leave.
    5 points
  16. Brick veneer, pretty standard building method. Timber frame with foil wrap over it, bricks are spaced out around 50mm leaving an air gap cavity for insulation. Add more insulation between the timber and you've got a double walled structure without the cost of doing two layers of brick, and something to screw the plaster to at the same time. Lot easier to install services eg wiring in too. As for tile - you can keep that stuff. Our house had concrete tile roof, and finding leaks was a nightmare. I ended up ripping them off and reroofing with Colorbond. No leaks since and the rain sounds a lot better!
    5 points
  17. Believe is a funny word. It's stronger than "think", but falls short of "know". It can be based on verifiable data (although that then changes to "know") or a complete lack of data, or anything in between. This means I don't particularly like it. If I don't know that something is real/valid/exists, but I think it might, then I say "I think". On the other hand if something is verifiable by reasonable, repeatable methods, then I'd say "I know". Alien life, for example. Given the number of stars in the universe and the calculated number of "goldilocks" planets, I think it's extremely likely that life has, is or will evolve in other star systems. Do I know this? No, I don't have any evidence. But I don't "believe" it either, I just think it's likely. Unfortunately this is seen as a negative in society. Not having a strong stance on every given subject is seen as a failure of character or intellect, where I'd argue the reverse is true. When it comes to god, or any other supernatural phenomena, I neither "believe" or even think it's likely. There's no reason for such a being or evidence of it's existence, and the "holy books" which write about it state firmly that it bears an extremely unlikely interest in aspects of humankind, such as who (and how) we mate, our personal thoughts and our "belief" in said being.
    5 points
  18. I've had a skim through the amendments and can't find anything that would suggest that could be allowed. If a person grows a prohibited plant or noxious weed, then I see no reason why they should not foot the bill for destroying it. Take the example in another offence where a person breaks a shop window with a brick. Shouldn't they pay yo have the broken glass replaced? There is no mention of authorities ripping out plants that are, or produce foodstuffs. The amendments allow for the destruction of foodstuffs, chemicals and fertilizers that fail to be consistent in composition with information on labels. Yes, there is an exemption for producing ID in certain circumstances, not every time. There do occur times when it is immediately unreasonable to produce ID. Consider the plain clothes constable arresting an offender in the act of of assault or robbery. It's a case of stop the offence as quickly as possible, thenprovide your authority for making the arrest. As far as I can see, anyone who thinks these amendments are the thin edge of the wedge to crack our rights is a conspiracy theory nutter.
    5 points
  19. DISMISSING SOMEONE ! All the members of the company's Board of Directors were called into the Chairman's office, one after another, until only Ted, the junior member, was left sitting outside. Finally, it was his turn to be summoned. Ted entered the office to find the Chairman and the other six Directors seated at the far end of the boardroom table. Ted was instructed to stand at the other end of the table, which he did. The Chairman looked Ted squarely in the eye, and with a stern voice, he asked: "Have you ever had sex with my secretary, Miss Floyd?" "Oh, no sir, positively not...!" Ted replied. "Are you absolutely sure...?" asked the chairman. "Honest, I've never been close enough to even touch her...!" "You'd swear to that...?" "Yes, I swear I've never had sex with Miss Floyd, anytime, anywhere.." insisted Ted. "Good. Then YOU fire her."
    5 points
  20. Ukraine is certainly winning the propaganda war; a few km west of us in a huge field of sunflowers (Ukraine colours) is a newly-installed viewing platform for tourists. Attached to the steps are two flagpoles flying the flags of Oz and Ukraine.
    5 points
  21. Polluting our atmosphere and water is obviously a bad thing. Most human activity has costs and benefits. We put satellites in orbit and use our shiny new GPS. There are many environmental problems we face of varying degrees. I have trouble understanding why leaving the decent stage of the lunar module on the moon is so much worse than driving our cars or flying our little airplanes. The parachute and backing shell on Mars are not there because engineers are being total dicks or don't give a toss. There is no way it could have been done any better with the technology we have at the moment. It would be a reasonable point of view to say we should not engage in space exploration until we can assure that we leave no trace. I don't believe this, I believe we do are best until we can do better. I believe the moon landings, Voyager, Pioneer Hubble Telescope, various Mars rovers etc. are a net benefit. If we draw up a table for example of what we have gained scientifically and technologically from the moon landings on one side and the damage caused to the Moon on the other side, I feel the balance tips toward exploration and I a not even sure how you quantify damage to the Moon. When it comes to environmental concerns I think the tens of thousands of words I have written on this forum indicate I am very pro environmentalism. As individuals we strike a balance between living our lives and trying not cause too many adverse affects. For many years I flew little aircraft often just in circles around an airfield. It is all too easy justify or not notice what we ourselves do, but be pretty keen to point out what others do. In the far future, perhaps when humans no longer exist some other intelligent civilization may land on Mars and study what our civilization has left behind. Perhaps some civilization will discover Voyager or Pioneer floating through space, will they consider it trash or examine and learn from it? This is like when archeologists excavate the detritus of ancient civilizations. When archeologist locate and ancient midden or ruins of a building they are excited and curious. I don't suppose any archeologist has ever lamented on "how untidy these people were" or "these awful people painting graffiti on these cave walls, its just vandalism" I don't see the picture of his family that Charlie Duke left on the Moon as being a wanton act of littering nor the numerus experiments. We can still measure the changing distance of the moon from the earth by bouncing a laser beam from reflector left during the Apollo years. I posted the Mars clip because I thought people would be interested in the technological achievements especially of the Ingenuity helicopter being that we are all interested in flying. I have no problem with the observation that there are many "bits of the planet Earth" on Mars but this seems to be all people are interested in. I might hold off on posting the little doco on the Webb Telescope (more junk!) Perhaps this is the wrong forum for this subject.
    5 points
  22. This is a negative post.....
    5 points
  23. Turned our microwave on its side. It was so happy.
    5 points
  24. We have penalty-containing legislation which prevents misleading and deceptive conduct by businesses and those penalties are regularly applied. In contrast, there are no laws to stop politicians or third parties from openly lying in election campaign advertising. This is wrong. Why? Because political parties advertise in order to have the electorate employ a party to provide a service to it - managing the operation of the Nation. If a person, or company, was set up to provide a service - say a financial management company as an example - its advertisements aimed at attracting customers must comply with "truth in advertising" legislation. The reasonable, honest amongst us agree that such compliance is a good thing. But political parties are not subject to this basic tenet of honesty. In 2021 Zali Steggall (she's the one who turfed out Tony Abbot) introduced a Private member's Bill, the Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Stop the Lies) Bill. During Question Time she asked the Prime Minister why lying in political advertisements was permissible. His response to that question can be watched by following this link: https://www.zalisteggall.com.au/commonwealth_electoral_amendment_stop_the_lying_bill What you will see there is ScoMo replying to a specific question by reading from a document clearly prepared in order for him to answer a Dorothy Dixer about the Government's handling of the COVID crisis. You can't say that he lied in that reply, but what a disservice to the Nation he did by not answering the question. Unfortunately, Steggal asked two questions at one, which made it easy for ScoMo to slip the noose. The first part of the question could have been answer simply with Yes or No, and the obvious get out of gaol answer was "No". Steggal could then have asked the supplementary question, "What is the Government going to do about it?" More and more we see examples of the Conservative riding roughshod over the people who elected them to do a job. They consider themselves as the political descendants of the bunyip aristocracy, a term coined by one Daniel Deniehy in 1853 in response to attempts by William Wentworth to establish a system of aristocratic titles in the colony of New South Wales. He accused the conservatives, led by the veteran Sydney politician William Wentworth and what Deniehy called "some dozen of his friends," of wanting to "confiscate for their own uses the finest portions of the public lands, to stereotype themselves into a standing government, so that they may retain, watch over, and protect the booty they wrest."
    5 points
  25. Putin visits a fortune teller and asks her what will happen in the near future. She says: I see you driving in a limousine through the busy crowd, the people are happy, laughing and cheering and jumping for joy, hugging each other and have big smiles on their faces. Putin asks her: ... do I wave to them? No she says, ... the coffin is closed.
    5 points
  26. I pay for everything by credit card unless there is a fee attached. Even something costing $1.50 from Bunnings. Aldi is the only place I go where there is a transaction charge for credit cards or tap & go transactions on a debit card & it is only 0.8%. If I insert the card & enter my pin number there is no charge. The banks are imposing a charge for their tap & go system even though it is simpler and takes less time. My credit card is free so has no points or rewards (you pay a fee for these cards) & I pay it off every month without fail. Reconciling our spending is as easy as pie. Also I don't need a wallet any more. I just take my phone & use google pay. It has all the loyalty cards built in, my drivers licence, pilot certificate & aircraft rego, vaccination status, bank details, health data etc and there are probably other things I could have in it that I haven't even checked on. I got $100.00 out of a cash machine about a year ago & still have most of it. When my wife goes shopping I can tell where she is in the shopping centre as the transactions are instantly on the system. The one time I was at a retailer & the system was down, they pulled out a zip/zap machine and I could still pay by card. The other option even if you only have your phone is to provide the credit card number and sign the amount and number as well as providing the CVC & expiry date. Then check the transaction as soon as you can. I check my balances every couple of days. Cash is pretty much dead from my point of view.
    5 points
  27. ALL of the criticism has come from his side of politics who probably know him best. His Captain's picks have been a disaster. They are also dead scared of having a REAL ICAC. That's really all you need to know.. Nev
    5 points
  28. The old bren gun carriers certainly did need a strong arm. The first 90 degrees of steering wheel rotation moved a cross arm, which moved the road wheel in the centre one way or the other. That put a bend in the track and gave you a big radius turn. The drive train was a 4 speed box and a flat head V8 Ford. Driving them in my opinion was great fun. The C class British tanks, that is Comet, Centurian Conqueres etc had a very complex gear box with two inputs from the engine. One ran through the gears in the normal way and the other powered an epicyclic steering system. I used to be able to explain how it worked, but that was nearly sixty years ago. Neutral gear gave you one track going forward and one in reverse when you pulled the steering lever. First gave you a fairly sharp radius turn and from memory fifth gear gave 110' radius turn. To really stuff you up though reverse gear reversed the steering. In the few write ups in motoring magazine by journos who have drive a Centurian, none of them mentioned this fact. After time in the army working on tanks among other things, I can think of nothing worse than having to go to war in one.
    4 points
  29. Speaking of Federal Erections and politicians - I remember someone's comment once about how Bronnie Bishop would give you a lump in the back of your pants instead of the front. I'd believe it.
    4 points
  30. Well, I have done my democratic duty and posted off my postal ballot forms so I guess I can tune out now.
    4 points
  31. Back to the election. Scotty and Co. are certainly poll driven like most pollies pre election. The Libs know their biggest hurdle in winning is Scotty himself, due to growing public dislike of the character. So now their mantra is 'it's not a popularity contest; you don't have to like him'. Scotty continually tells us we don't have to like him, and any of his cronies now give out the same sheep like bleat. They are right. You don't have to like him. Nobody is forcing you. You can dislike him of your own free will. They are also right about not having to like the leader in order for him to be able to perform the job. Another amusing aspect of the campaign is Scotties latest brainwave - telling us that he knows he has to change if re-elected. He's promising he'll change if we elect him. It doesn't get much funnier than that. I don't think too many people would be silly enough to believe the Libs will be a better government in the next term. If they wanted to do better, they could have started on that one a long time ago. The only believable options are that if re-elected, the government will be three more years of the same, or it will get worse.
    4 points
  32. This explains how all animals want equal pay for equal work. It's only 2 minutes so won't make a big hole in your day
    4 points
  33. The proof of that is try and master their language and see how hard it is. We're good at pointing the finger, but Australians aren't well known for speaking more than one language. Edit: non migrant Australians, that is.
    4 points
  34. Here is an analysis of the state of the Russian Military first published by the Ecomomist. Basically it is a complete basket case & recovery will be slow and painful. https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/economist/300584653/russias-army-is-in-a-woeful-state
    4 points
  35. I think this video hightlights why the teal (and otther) independents are in with a shot. Intersting the independent candidate for Kooyong knew her figures...
    4 points
  36. Angus Taylor is one of the most hypocritical, dishonest and corrupt liberal politicians in Australia. I can't remember a single time that he has ever spoken the truth when posed with difficult questions. He lies through his teeth with a straight face every time & completely ignores facts when presented to him. He should be in jail. Morrison is the same and of course there is Bridget Mackenzie (of Sports Rorts fame) & Barnaby from coalition partner, The Nationals currently forced to provide lip service to emissions reduction while promoting new coal mines. There are plenty more to add to the list. The Libs are really worried about the support shown for independent candidates and they could lose several seats and therefore any chance of a majority government. Morrison & the right wing media have now gone into attack dog mode over the independents gaining popularity. LNP still fail to do anything meaningful about Climate Change which has emerged far and away the most important issue to voters and is one of the major reasons many of the Independent candidates even exist as the LNP has been hijacked by the right & pushed moderates out. Morrison keeps harping on about how Australias emissions reduction are better than almost everyone else. For example about 88% of electricity comes from coal & gas fired power stations so a reduction of 20% of that is a lot easier than say NZ that already has 85% of its electricity from renewables & they have committed to 100% by 2030.
    4 points
  37. This misadventure of Putin's will be remembered in history as one of the dumbest military campaigns since Napoleon and Hitler's attempts at taking Russia. It will feature in military textbooks as a prime example of how not to wage war. What a half-baked, stupid plan. He made far better use of his military previous to February 24th.. ie: creating a bluff to the world of the second most powerful army. After six weeks of war, the world knows it's the second best army in Ukraine. What's the saying? - all tip and no iceberg. First he starts out with run down, poorly maintained gear, poorly trained troops lacking any norm of military discipline, and all overseen by third world standard leadership and command. The command structure at best, could be described as pathetic. Hoping for a Hitler like blitzkrieg to cut off the head, he splits his forces in the mud season with poor logistic planning and support. The comedy of errors just snowballed from there. At every turn, the Russians ran into strife. Even their secure encrypted communications systems failed. They had to resort to using their mobile phones on Ukrainian networks. This not only gave away their communications, but also enabled geo location of their units to be hit by artillery and drone strikes. Putin's failing was overestimating his military's ability, and underestimating Ukrainian will to fight (and fight smart) and Western nations will to pull together to provide support. Putin is now at a dead end and there's no easy way out for him. An estimated 65% of his fighting forces are in Ukraine and a lot of them will have to be brought back to Russia eventually. If he declares a victory and tries to hold on to what he's got, he won't be able to sustainably hold on to it. Especially not now that Ukraine and the West can smell blood and are prepared to wear him down in a war of attrition. If he abandons his 'special operation' and declares war on Ukraine, he can mobilise the population through conscription. The problem is, that will be as handy as a hip pocket in a singlet. He doesn't have the skeleton training regiments with skilled NCO's and Officers to train them. Most of the skilled NCO's are in Ukraine fighting. If he sends heaps of raw recruits into Ukraine, it will be a turkey shoot for the Ukrainians. If that happens, and the war drags on, eventually the public in Russia will learn some of the truth about what's been going on. Which ever scenario you look at, Putin is extremely vulnerable. His only real power is nukes, the elephant in the room. That's the scary bit, especially now that Putin is showing all the signs of having become mentally unhinged.
    4 points
  38. A First grade teacher was having trouble with one of her students. The teacher asked, “Johnny what is your problem?” Johnny answered, “I’m too smart for the first grade. My sister is in the third grade and I’m smarter than she is! I think I should be in the third grade too!” The teacher had had enough. She took Johnny to the principal’s office. While Johnny waited in the outer office, the teacher explained to the principal what the situation was. The principal told the teacher he would give the boy a test and if he failed to answer any of his questions he was to go back to the first grade and behave. The teacher agreed. Johnny was brought in and the conditions are explained to him and he agrees to take the test. Principal: “What is 3 x 3?” Johnny: “9”. Principal: “What is 6 x 6?” Johnny: “36”. And so it went with every question the principal thought a third grader should know. The principal looks at the teacher and tells her, “I think Johnny can go to the third grade. “The teacher says to the principal, “Let me ask him some questions?” The principal and Johnny both agree. The teacher asks, “What does a cow have four of that I have only two of?” Johnny, after a moment, “Legs.” Teacher: “What is in your pants that you have but I do not have?” The principal’s eyes open really wide and before he could stop the answer, Johnny replied, “Pockets.” Teacher: “What does a dog do that a man steps into?” Johnny: “Pants” Teacher: “What starts with an ‘F’ and ends in ‘K’ that means a lot of excitement?” Johnny: “Fire truck.” The principal breathed a sigh of relief and told the teacher, “Put Johnny in the fifth grade, I missed the last four questions myself.
    4 points
  39. Putins Army Chiefs are reportedly urging Putin to declare war so that the general population can be mobilised and martial law declared. They are embarrassed & frustrated by their constant failures with the Ukraine invasion the latest after Afghanistan, Syria and Chechnya. How much military hardware can be mustered now is another problem. As well, Russian armament systems are chock full of Western technology so with no supply of that componentry those systems will slowly grind to a halt. If war & martial law is declared Western businesses will be nationalised & it seems that as Western companies are shutting up shop already that is underway now. So they call up reserves and their equipment, revoke the 1 year conscription limit, conscript more ordinary people, but if they run short of equipment and losses continue at the same alarming rate then who knows what will happen with their last resort being biological and nuclear options. Putin is unlikely to back down & his military won't accept total failure. The only options will be some sort of takeover by realists or it will end badly for the whole planet.
    4 points
  40. Not sure whether the entire content of this thread should be moved over to the 'gripes' thread, or the 'funnies'
    4 points
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