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Albo & Co.


willedoo
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Is that an order?   Re the DIG at Albo being overseas that was an orchestrated attack by the ex government and started by Dazzling Dan Tehan.. .. Anyone who thinks such travels are fun  and a junket, should try doing it. It's nothing like a holiday.  Nev

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Hmmm. Albo isn't going to the USA, or UK? Does that suggest our continuing trust of them, or the idea that they aren't worth the effort?  It seems Labor has leashed the Dogs of War with China and is prepared to express our concerns firmly, but civilly.

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So far, Albe is doing ok I reckon. Better than Scomo for sure.

I wish that we had taken the opportunity to congratulate China on some big space thing they did. Space is big enough for everyone and we could do the world some good by congratulating and financially rewarding everybody when they do something good. I think that includes the US, India, Chine, the Europeans and the Russians.

Lately it seems that the Chinese are doing more than most.

 

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Such as dumping their space rocket debris carelessly on the moon? As the first person who threw a piece of plastic waste into the ocean, said, "Hey, it's only a bit of plastic, and the ocean's huge!"

 

Of course, the Americans are the primary leaders in the pollution of Space with junk and debris from space exploration, and even nuclear explosions in Space - but that doesn't count, because there are no Space Police or Space Laws.

 

https://www.livescience.com/moon-rocket-double-crater-in-moon

 

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Posted (edited)

I have to admit, Albo has started better than I thought, although I still think he is a deputy waiting for a leader in some respects. He carried himself well across Europe. He seems to be working well with the NSW government with respect to the varroa mite bee crisis, announcing an $18m joint compensation with Perrotet. Not sure what is happenign with aid to those who are worst affected by the floods... Of course, on teh foreign circuit, his team has been doing very well.

 

Though there have been a couple of decisions that are a little perplexing. No longer requiring foreign arrivals to be vaccinated among rising infections is one. Allowin COVID support funding to expire while cases are on the rise and companies struggle with workers being ill with Covid is another.

 

All in all, early days, but more to like than dislike at this stage. Sadly, they have some tests coming up, especially with the economy, which after 10 or so years of mismanagement, has left Australia (or more accurately, Autralians) vulnerable to worldwide shocks.

 

Hopefully a federal ICAC is established quck smart and does have reach going back at least 10 years. Would be both good and just to see those whoe badly mismanaged all sorts of federal issues corruptly be held to account.

 

They may want to insert a clause in the bill that requires  2/3 majority of parliament to change the bill (assuming it is constitutional to do so, although it would probably breach the doctrine of parliaments can;t bind successors), to protect from the next corrupt government to be elected to water it down. Scatch that, may be a way to insert it into the constitution.. a referedum, anyone?

 

Edited by Jerry_Atrick
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14 hours ago, Jerry_Atrick said:

…Hopefully a federal ICAC is established quck smart and does have reach going back at least 10 years. Would be both good and just to see those whoe badly mismanaged all sorts of federal issues corruptly be held to account.

 

They may want to insert a clause in the bill that requires  2/3 majority of parliament to change the bill (assuming it is constitutional to do so, although it would probably breach the doctrine of parliaments can;t bind successors), to protect from the next corrupt government to be elected to water it down. Scatch that, may be a way to insert it into the constitution.. a referedum, anyone?

Only a very brave government holds a referendum; perhaps best to put a few major reforms to the voters in one go, prefereably with on a day we have to vote anyway:

A premable recognising Aboriginal stewartship.

An independently funded and administered federal anti-corruption body.

Limits on concentration of media ownership.

 

Sadly, events often overtake the best-laid plans. Plenty of unforseen plagues (like Covid) could derail this agenda, but several very likely national challenges are closing in our national government:

Preparing for worse climate disasters, reining in national debt, diversifying our foreign trade away from dependence on China, standing up to China’s very assertive Communist Party…

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SWMBO is always watching the Border Security show on TV, and it never ceases to amaze me how many travellers are totally ignorant or uncaring of Australia's quarantine laws - or they think they can BS their way through them!!

 

Additionally, I am amazed at the pathetic fines handed out to quarantine offenders on this show. I'm with Spacey, I reckon a lot should be jailed, or refused entry to Australia. 

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A few decades ago Australia assisted Indonesia to eradicate Foot and Mouth disease.
This was a very good use of our diminishing foreign aid budget, given the centuries-old tradition of their people fishing our northern waters and even landing to make camp. We know they often brought animals with them (feral cats in northern Australia have more Asian DNA than European). One infected pig or cow brought ashore could destroy our export meat industry.
Sadly, governments have tended to listen to stupid, short-sighted criticism of foreign aid; many valuable projects have been culled for lack of funding. China’s moves into our neighbourhood might be one consequence.

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1 minute ago, Old Koreelah said:

Sadly, governments have tended to listen to stupid, short-sighted criticism of foreign aid; many valuable projects have been culled for lack of funding. China’s moves into our neighbourhood might be one consequence.

Usually uninformed.  People actually think we spend more on foreign aid than we do.  

I remember hearing about a survey where they asked people how much they thought we spent on foreign aid as a proportion of gross national income, and how much we should be spending. 

I can't remember whether people thought we spent $5 or $10 (5% or 10%), but they thought it should be reduced to $2 (2%).


In reality, we spend 0.21% (21 cents per $100 gross national income).  $2 would be a 1,000% increase.

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One of the biggest problems associated with foreign aid contributions is making sure it doesn't simply end up in corrupt politicians pockets - which it often does.

On that basis, direct Australian assistance with projects is a far better setup, rather than just giving them money.

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I remember reading somewhere that foreign aid comes with strings attached in the form it must go to Aussie or nominated companies for actually doing something. If that is the case, then it is not a bad policy becausem in theory, any profits enf up back in Aussie hands. However, there are areas where this will not work, of course, such as the many charities that are funded with foreign aid.

 

There is a perceived problem in the UK that a lot of its foreign aid ends up lining corrupt pollies from third world countries. I imagine it is probably true - but to be honest, have not done the research.

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On 10/7/2022 at 9:50 PM, Marty_d said:

Usually uninformed.  People actually think we spend more on foreign aid than we do.  

I remember hearing about a survey where they asked people how much they thought we spent on foreign aid as a proportion of gross national income, and how much we should be spending. 

I can't remember whether people thought we spent $5 or $10 (5% or 10%), but they thought it should be reduced to $2 (2%).


In reality, we spend 0.21% (21 cents per $100 gross national income).  $2 would be a 1,000% increase.

It’s very easy for surveys to exploit people’s ignorance.

 

Foreigh aid is not always helpful to the recipients. It often leads to corruption and a distorted economy.

One little country seems to be doing just fine without it; even though not recognised by the international community, this little nation is a developing democracy pulling itself up by its own bootstraps:

 

https://devpolicy.org/doing-better-without-aid-the-case-of-somaliland-20210317/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somaliland

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1 hour ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

I have thought for a long time that our aid to PNG is wrongly given to their pollies.

Their appalling levels of corruption and incompetence was demonstrated when PNG recently hosted an International meeting; they imported twenty luxury sports cars to impress the visitors. Afterwards, nobody seemed to know where they’d gone. Given the crappy roads, probably not too far.

 

 

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