Jump to content

The Best Single Man's Retirement Property


Recommended Posts

Very noice - but isn't it a bit close to the Murray River? Doesn't every second property in NSW go under a metre of water when the creek rises? I'm pretty wary of flat land next to waterways.

 

Also - what's the story with the perfectly clean, spotless yard? It all looks a bit suss, no "blokes shed" should ever be that clean, a huge pile of "project material" must always occupy the yard area.

 

Finally - NSW must be pretty lax in their building regulations. If I try to use any secondhand or bush materials over here on the Left coast, I'd be put through the hoops to try and get approval to use same - every item of material used in the construction of buildings - commercial/industrial or residential - must be new.

I guess they might have relaxed the building laws there in regard to Class 10 buildings. A problem that may also arise there, is because the place is obviously located in a residential area, there'd be a raft of regulations governing what you can do, or can't do in the shed, and perhaps even some highly restrictive noise/pollution regulations.

 

In all of W.A., it would be impossible to even build a shed that big in a residential area, as there are strict regulations governing shed sizes in residential areas here. 

 

Edited by onetrack
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any TIDY workshop is rigged for show only. IF you're on multiple projects keep the bits in a pile near the project or you will lose track of them. Never put parts in drums that don't have little holes to let water out. The best way to make treasure worthless is have it get flooded. or have a fire or live near the sea.  or a salty lake area.. Nev

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I obtained a Bentley engine as part of a deal a few years back. It was in a wooden crate wrapped in plastic, outside a shed. When i took it apart the sump was full of water and most parts ruined.

  • Informative 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Tocumwal aerodrone, which apparently was Australia's largest WWII base, is about 2 or three miles away, so no probs, there.

 

I have been going to Toke for over 35 years, and I don't know of a time it has flooded the actual town; yes the river has flooded, and to the south the ground is a little lower; which seems to take any overflow.

 

The drone shot looks more or less east --> west over Tocumwal ("Toke" in the local vernacular).

 

The shed is actually in the original industrial part of the town - which is west of the Newell Highway. If you look at the drone shot, behind (to the west) of the property is another industriasl building; to the north (left) are old silo towers. To the east (ahead) of those towers - the red tiled roof is the Tattersalls pub - it used to be a little rough around the edges, but these days it is a nice family pub. The brown/cream building ahead and to the left of the shed is a motel - was built in the 90s. The bridge that can just be made out that leads to the roundabout is the Newell highway.

 

Yes, the tools and piles of junk are missing - but they are selling it and what looks like a hefty price.. However, if I had a spare 1/2 million laying around, I may well be tempted [edit] and add man decorations to it.

 

 

Edited by Jerry_Atrick
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 17/7/2022 at 10:01 AM, onetrack said:

… If I try to use any secondhand or bush materials over here on the Left coast, I'd be put through the hoops to try and get approval to use same - every item of material used in the construction of buildings - commercial/industrial or residential - must be new…

Wot a crazy rule! I could never have afforded to build my house with all-new materials. The price is not the only consideration. Just ask a builder: preowned stuff is often better quality than what you can get today.

I’ve had forty years service from my second-hand hot water tank, wash-basin, some furniture, most of the windows and almost all the doors. Plenty of people who build when we did are now replacing the crappy new stuff they bought, while ours look like lasting another forty years.

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the old timber is in good condition, there's no way it should be rejected for any part of the structure. Treated Pine is crap and untreated is near useless. 

  The old stuff may be hard to mill and drive nails into. Some of it was adzed to size originally. Nev

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's all driven by lawyers and fear of litigation, unfortunately. We can use secondhand materials in construction, but the councils really put you through the hoops if you choose to utilise it. They're terrified that your house or shed built with used materials will fall down, thanks to using materials of an unknown standard and quality, and they'll be sued if it happens, and someone gets hurt/killed. There's a good balance in there somewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be considering making the frame of steel sections (Galvanised) these days. It'll take little cyclonic winds more reliably. Cast some prefab concrete sections on site. A modern house is a matchstick castle with chalk and cardboard walls interior. . Got a life of about 40 years max. Nev

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I built a house on a farm using shed-frames. It is really strong. The council were satisfied with the " farm buildings are exempt "  stuff in the regs.

It was only the septic system that we chose to do completely legally. The Plumber came out like he was god and to this day, the septic is the worst item on the property. The council guy who approved the whole septic thing had about a grade 7 understanding of the situation. Instead of a really long but shallow setup ( there is heavy clay below about 100mm depth, but a nice slope away from the house, we had to put in a short but deep system because the council guy had a diagram showing such a drawing.

We get by with a pump out onto a nearby paddock because the septic system doesn't work. It pumps out of the short deep clay and the water soaks into the paddock's topsoil some distance away.

  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For heavy shallow clay ground, the septic system should have had a trench bulldozed out and a couple of dozen truckloads of sandy, friable soil trucked back in to the excavation.

The septic tank could've been installed in the clay, but the leach drain should then be installed in the sandy trucked-in soil.

 

Edited by onetrack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, facthunter said:

Your Bogs become an odourous bog

Perhaps transpiration beds are only useful in areas where the rate at which plants can take up and transpire moisture is higher than the rate of precipitation. Probably best used away from the east coast.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I was building now I would go for a composting toilet. They are pretty well designed now and have minimal smell, plus they save a lot of water and don't require pumping out at great expense every few years.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...