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Bicycle Development


Sapphire

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A lot of development went into this bike seat.

 

What has his got to do with aviation? Absolutely nothing unless they design a/c seats the same way.

Unless you want man powered aircraft, I don't see any reason for a seat like that.

 

As for the seat development - I'm not surprised that there was a lot of effort to develop it.

 

You'd think, that at first glance, you'd want something that's wide and soft to seat comfortably, but a seat like that would be actually very uncomfortable - due to the need for your legs to move around and the fact that soft material tends to deform and go into places it wasn't supposed to go.

 

On the other hand if you go too hard you'll end up with sore bum.

 

Then there's the issue of that big hole in the middle - put there to allow blood flow to your important bits.

 

But after all this I'm still not sure what you wanted to tell us - maybe that seat shape looks sort of like it could fly?spacer.png

 

 

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Err... looks like a ladies seat! spacer.png

 

 

I ve seen a similar seat but on a different web site:naughty:

 

Zibi said: On the other hand if you go too hard you'll end up with sore bum.

 

I like a seat about half meter wide and thick and soft as a pillow.

 

 

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  • 10 years later...
23 minutes ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

Why are there not more electric bikes around?

I think it's because more people use bikes for exercise rather that mere transport. Electric bikes seem to be favoured by food delivery people, and that seems reasonable, since they aren't out for the exercise. 

 

I would discount price as well.  Basic electric bikes cover the same price range as good quality treadlies.

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I ride an electric bike for exercise.  People often think that an electric bike is just a small electric motorcycle.  The truth is an electric bike that complies with the law only really assists.   For me, it flattens out the hills.   In the 2 years I have owned this bike I have lost 7 kilos.  The longest ride I have done is 90km. I don't think I could have done this without help on the hills.    My wife and I regularly ride on the state's system of rail trails. One brilliant ride we have done and will do again is from Bright to Beechworth. 

 

I now ride just about everywhere whilst my car sits idle.   I even do a large portion of our grocery shopping on the bike.

 

I think ev bike sales are very strong - 

 

E-bike: • sales have increased by approximately 500% in Australia since 2017 but are limited due to the worldwide demand3. sales in 2019-20 were 48,000 units and have nearly doubled each year since 2017.

 

I find that whenever I am out or about I usually get people wanting to ask me about the bike.

 

The power assistance allows me to make substantial journeys.  Later this year I am planning to ride all the way around Port Phillip Bay from Geelong to Geelong.

 

 

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1 minute ago, old man emu said:

Octave,

I assume that you are past retirement age. How many in that age group do ride either type? I suggest that the younger people form the bigger market.

 

Actually, it is becoming very popular amongst older people.   You see this, especially on rail trails where the average age is quite high.  It may be different in the CBD.   The vast majority of people who approach me are older and I think they see me (an oldster) riding and wonder if they could get into it.  

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That is the reason for the ' smaller ' numbers sold .

BUREAUCRACY ., ! Restictions on speed or power , just the same as the rules for electric ' scooter's ' .

My daughter bought one & has to pretend it's a push scooter , whenever the 'revenuers are about .

What next " wheel " size tax on pushbikes !.

spacesailor

 

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37 minutes ago, spacesailor said:

That is the reason for the ' smaller ' numbers sold .

 

Sales are booming, in fact there has been a shortage, I had to wait a couple of months for mine.

38 minutes ago, spacesailor said:

Restictions on speed or power , just the same as the rules for electric ' scooter's ' .

 

I don't think the restrictions are unreasonable.    A beginner cyclist can produce 75-100 watts per hour. A fit amateur at about 100 watts per hour. A pro cyclist can reach 400 watts per hour.   The maximum motor for a bike (excluding cargo bikes) is 250w.  This means if I am producing 100Wh myself and the motor can contribute 250 Wh then the total is in the realm of a pro rider.   The maximum speed to remain legal is 25km but this is without pedaling.   I can get up to about 38km sustained with full assistance and I would not want to go any faster than this,

 

In actual fact, you can order motors from overseas up to (and possibly beyond) 750W.  These motors dont really look different externally and I suspect that there are those who fit such larger large motors.   I don't imagine the police randomly stop bikes and examine their motors.  I imagine if you don't make a nuisance of yourself or injure someone you are probably fine.

 

I have just returned from a trip to the supermarket for a forgotten ingredient.  My journey takes me through a set of traffic lights.  I usually filter through to the bike-marked area at the front of the traffic.    I always imagine the cars behind waiting for the lights to turn green are thinking this old codger on a bike is going to hold me up.  When the lights do turn green I have already selected full power and I am in the best gear.   By the time I am across the intersection, they are just moving off. 

 

I am a big fan of alternative forms of micro transport.   I think there is much potential and perhaps there is a big place for more power e bikes that are more like a small motorbike but this can only be successful with enough regulation to avoid chaos.

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12 minutes ago, old man emu said:

Seriously, a word of warning. The early bird often gets caught by the red light runner.

Yep, I do ride defensively. It is a big wide open intersection with good visibility each way.  

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For those who think e-bikes are modern, here is the first hub drive e-bike. Pretty forward thinking, eh!

 

PS....... Year of 1895

 

"6-pole brush-and-commutator direct current (DC) hub motor mounted in the rear wheel"

 

 

Patent1.png

Patent2.png

Edited by nomadpete
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I am quite interested in city planning and bike or micro transport.  Lately, I have had a deep dive into examples of livable cities.   You can't really beat Holland. Most people ride and bikes are given precedence over cars.  This is also good for car drivers because those who have to drive are not sharing the road with huge numbers of cars, everyone wins.

 

I do wish we could do the same here. 

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3 minutes ago, facthunter said:

That part of Holland is very flat. Also Amsterdam has a population of about 800, 000 That's a pretty small city.    Nev

I think the population of Amsterdam is 1.16 Million.   Whilst not a huge city by international standards it is almost the size of Adelaide.    You have to take into account that the number of people in Amsterdam that cycle is huge.    In Amsterdam around 45% of journeys are made by bike.  Whilst it is true that Amsterdam is reasonably flat the growing proportion of e bikes means it is practical.    In Amsterdam I think it is between 60 to 70& of kids ride to school. 

 

Other cities in the Netherlands cities like Utrecht and Rotterdam are also great livable cities,

 

 

 

 

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If I had ridden a bike to work before I retired, it would have been 21km each way, up hill and down dale. Quite a bit on top of an 8 hour day. And in Melbourne, it can be brilliant sunshine one minute, and pouring rain 10 minutes later. As they say, four seasons in one day.

 

P.S.: And I'm not even in the outer suburbs.

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3 minutes ago, red750 said:

21km each way

Quite a ride but I guess doable on an E bike.  In the Netherlands, a large percentage of people use bike combined with rail for longer distances.    Dont get me wrong I do not say absolutely everyone should ride to work however that fact that so many people do massively reduces the number of cars on the road.

 

In terms of safety, I think people get a distorted view. When a cyclist is killed it makes the news although not every car death does or at least has the high profile of a bike death. It is a little like what the average person thinks of the dangers of sports or GA aviation.    

 

I am happy to ride through the centre of Geelong and I do this often.  Luckily there is some good (by Australian standards) infrastructure in Geelong.    It is unfortunate that so many people are put off by perceived dangers and of course the real dangers of cycling.    One reason that so many Dutch people of all ages ride so much is the intelligent infrastructure thathas been built and continues to be built.   I do get a little sick of the "oh it wouldn't work here" people. The Dutch took a deliberate decision to make happier and healthier cities.   

 

 

 

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