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Geoffrey Edelsten dies


onetrack
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I must say I was a little surprised when I saw this news tonight - mostly because I don't consider 78 to be all that old.

 

But perhaps Geoffs high-flying, tumultuous career, including his multiple hookups with a string of young gold-diggers, all added up, to wear him out.

 

RIP Geoffrey, at the very least you provided us all with regular doses of flamboyant entertainment.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-11/geoffrey-edelsten-dies-aged-78/100210062

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Have a look at Bernie Ecclestone of F1 fame.. For some fellas, having a fit glam trophy wife by their side is an expression of their masculinity and strength, I suppose. At just over 5'2", I guess he has a point to prove (I am not much taller, but I am OK with it...)

 

 

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Peter - I think many blokes have a need to have a pretty young thing hanging off their arm, like some people need to wear watches with outsize dials. It's all about showing off.

I seriously doubt whether these couples have anything like a "normal" man-woman relationship, as most people have.

 

These gold-digging women are chasing exposure as well, and the lure of money and glitzy accessories being showered on them is irresistible.

Most of these young women come from financially-deprived situations, and usually have had no worthy father figure in their lives, either.

 

I remember reading many years ago how a good father-daughter relationship develops the girl into a woman who can keep up a consistent and stable man-woman relationship, in her later life.

The basic problem is so many blokes have no fathering abilities at all, they're content to inseminate women regularly, and then piss off and leave the kids upbringing solely to the mother, or other people.

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My wife at 66 is stillnthe young woman i met in my thirties,vibrant,funny,fitter than me(tennis golf trekking)great work ethic only 3 months ago retired gives me space to do what i like keeps me on my toes 38 years married we still like our time away together great cook and i still have pic of her in my wallet taken in kings park perth in 1983 to me she is gorgeous 

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If you fellas think you have bad back seat driving partners/wives, I'll lend you mine for a short trip... She is the worst backseat driver, ever. Thankfully she refuses to fly with me (and almost refuses to fly in the airliners). It is totally a control-freakish thing..

 

If we drive anywhere, I really do have to mentally prepare for the onslaught... The eternal fliching and operating the brake; the "your'e too close to the car in front", "going too fast", "going too slow", "too close to the kerb", "too close to the centre of the road" and it goes on on on in different crescendos.

 

One evening, I had the pleasure of driving my partner, daughter, and the mother of on of my daughter's classmates home after a student play at my daughter's school (the classmate boarded overnight). Of course, from the second I reversed out of the car park to the second I dropped off the other mother, it was non-stop. As I dropped off the other mother, she tapped me on the shoulder and said something like, "Don't worry, JA, you're driving was fine.. and you have the patience of a saint.". For the 250 yard drive to our place, my partner was unusually silent. Unnervingly so!

 

[Edit] Oh, and no, my partner doesn't look over my shoulder when I am on the forum 😉

 

Edited by Jerry_Atrick
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I'm glad I'm not the only one to suffer from the better half doing the driving from the passenger seat. But when I let her drive, I do the same to her, in the same tone of voice.

She knows what I'm doing, and admits she makes a terrible passenger. But I think it comes from a lack of confidence in her own driving skills.

I don't have a problem with mine, I've driven well over 2,500,000 kms over 56 years, on all types of roads, in all types of vehicles, up to low loaders hauling oversize earthmovers, and I've never had a serious accident. 

 

But I certainly have had a few narrow escapes via foolish moves from other drivers. Probably the worst was meeting a Landcruiser hauling a big tandem trailer, on my side of the road, travelling at 110kmh, overtaking a bus on the crest of a hill, over double white lines. I was driving my Holden ute at the time, it was around 1984.

I only had a few seconds before we had a head-on. I stood on the brakes hard to wash off speed in a straight line, and steered towards the side of the bus, hoping the Landcruiser was going to go to my left.

Most people swerve left off the road when faced with an oncoming vehicle, and still have a head-on. He did swerve to my left, fortunately, and we only missed by a metre.

I was so angry, I stopped and spun around, and chased him for about 5 kms, I wanted to kill him. But he wasn't stopping for me or anybody. I gave up when I cooled down, and resumed my trip. 

 

I am fearful of depressed and suicidal people swerving into my path to kill themselves. I've known of a number of major accidents where this happened, and it worries me, there's a few of them out there.

 

Then there's the drivers who fall asleep at the wheel - even in the middle of the day - and who cause head-ons. The major disaster in the link below was caused by a bloke in a Ford Ranger colliding head-on with a road train (double) on the Stuart Hwy in S.A. The Ranger swerved into the path of the truck on a causeway, possibly from going to sleep, or perhaps a suicide, and the truckie (who was a local from Perth), had nowhere to go to avoid him.

Both vehicles caught fire and the fire destroyed a number of culverts causing the highway to collapse. Both the Ranger driver and the truck passenger died, and the truck driver only just survived. The devastation is enormous, the Ranger must have been doing 120kmh.

 

https://7news.com.au/news/car-crash/tragedy-as-two-people-die-after-fiery-crash-in-south-australia-c-2302125

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2 hours ago, onetrack said:

I am fearful of depressed and suicidal people swerving into my path to kill themselves. I've known of a number of major accidents where this happened, and it worries me, there's a few of them out there.

I have developed the same fear... and when I am driving on roads where there is only a white line or not much more dividing my lane and an oncoming lane, I am forever working out escape routes should the next oncoming car decide to cross into my direction of travel.

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There was a story in a motorbike magazine in the early 1970s by a bloke who had that head on experience. He leapt straight up and his lower legs were smashed but otherwise he was ok as he sailed over the oncoming car. It was on the Newell highway as I recall. I often think of that when riding with an oncoming car. Not that I could jump up to save myself these days.

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In recent years I've noticed a lot of oncoming vehicles wandering over the centreline. It always gives me a shot of adrenaline, as I work out my escape route. The biggest problem is 'which side do I aim?'.

Mostly they are on their phone and heavy vehicles are no better than young invincibles even though professional drivers should know better.

 

Amend that. ALL drivers should know better!

Edited by nomadpete
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