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Don't eat meat


Yenn
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I see in the news today that the anti meat eaters are at it again.

Eating meat leads to an increase in Covid 19, because it spreads at the abbatoirs and working conditions make it even worse.

Millions of Mink have been killed because they were carrying the virus. Mink was exported from Europe to China. I wonder if that is how the virus got into China.

It has been proved, so they say, that we should eat beans rather than meat,, because meat production is bad for the environment. My personal opinion is that if I tried to grow enough beans to live on I would not survive, because poor soil and low rainfall would result in crop failures, but I can run cattle and eat them.

I think the anti meat army are using covid 19 as a weapon to get us all to fall in with their faulty thinking.

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On 07/11/2020 at 5:13 PM, Yenn said:

...It has been proved, so they say, that we should eat beans rather than meat,, because meat production is bad for the environment. My personal opinion is that if I tried to grow enough beans to live on I would not survive, because poor soil and low rainfall would result in crop failures, but I can run cattle and eat them.

Our species long ago evolved to eat meat- some cultures more than others. The surge in global cattle numbers is linked to growing affluence across the world, as the rich world is eating far beyond our planet’s sustaineable yield. Many of the rich are also eating far beyond the health needs of their bodies, resulting in a global pandemic of obesity.
For humanity to eat more sustainably, so we don’t bugger up more of nature, then we need to adapt to other food sources.
Many exciting technologies being developed might see cities soon producing much of their own fresh food, with nearby ocean kelp and fish farms. 
 

Over half of humanity is now urbanized. Across Europe recently-abandoned farmland is going back to nature, with even wolves and bears returning.

 

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I think the anti meat army are using covid 19 as a weapon to get us all to fall in with their faulty thinking.

Many species of domestic animals owe their existence to our food economy; if we phase out meat we also phase out all those cuddly calves, lambs, etc.

 

Despite not eating meat for over forty years, I defend the cattlemen; the marginal country they graze is not much good for any other food production. Even as synthetic meat gains wide acceptance, their grass-fed beef should always retain a niche market.

 

 

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The problem with grazing European animals in other continents is that they don't suit the ecology. If efforts were made to farm the native animals on the other countries perhaps extinction wold be halted and environmental damage reduced. I full accept that there are great difficulties to be overcome to "domesticate" these animals, but where there's a will ...

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Here's something I've heard but not seen proven: In ww2, could the english have survived without food imports if they had switched agriculture for horticulture on a big scale?

Down at the farm, you could grow broad-acre cabbages in a normal year, and in england I reckon it would be easy to grow lots of stuff like that.

So, could those poms have survived the blitz by eating sauerkraut and potatoes and eggs?

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1 hour ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

could those poms have survived the blitz by eating sauerkraut and potatoes and eggs?

Nutritionally, probably yes, but morale-wise, no. The civilian populations of the European combatants were working long hours at hard work to keep up the supply of war materials. Probably the only source of basic pleasure was a good meal at the end of the day, and a pint or cuppa to wash it down. Take those away and morale goes down. Ask anyone who has been forced to remove things from their normal diet on medical advice. Notice how all the diet schemes come with recipes for combinations of ingredients that you'd never consider using pre-diet. Ans all those schemes have lots of recipes for deserts.

 

You an see the difference between Europeans who were heavily rationed and the Americans who were not so heavily rationed..

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/transcoded/6/63/Point_Rationing_of_Foods_190613_LTPC.webm/Point_Rationing_of_Foods_190613_LTPC.webm.480p.vp9.webm

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During WW2 I was living on a farm just outside London, where we produced cabbage, lettuce, tree fruit, beans and peas, plus tomatoes and cucumbers in glasshouses. We sent a five ton truck to Covent Garden market six days a week and the farm work force included landgirls and also Italian POWs. The only animals were my own rabbits and the cart horses that did the heavy work on the farm. Manure used was mainly sewage sludge from the sewage treatment plant in Staines.

Last time I sa the place was about 15 years ago and what hadn't been turned int high rise was derelict country, full of weeds.

The farming in the UK now seems to be more aligned to keeping the tourists happy with pretty scenery and foxes and rabbits running free, than providing food for the country.

When I left to come to Australia, my boss closed down his dairy herd, then later sacked the other man who had worked with us and produced a few beef cattle and sheep at highly subsidised rates.

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1 hour ago, Yenn said:

...When I left to come to Australia, my boss closed down his dairy herd, then later sacked the other man who had worked with us and produced a few beef cattle and sheep at highly subsidised rates.

Our little Aussie farm became unviable when Britain joined the EC; we lost our major market.
I presume that Brexit will be pretty traumatic for British farmers, but long-term they will adapt, as ours have.

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On 08/11/2020 at 12:06 PM, Old Koreelah said:

Despite not eating meat for over forty years, I defend the cattlemen; the marginal country they graze is not much good for any other food production. Even as synthetic meat gains wide acceptance, their grass-fed beef should always retain a niche market.

That's right Old Koreelah, a lot of that country is no good for cropping and also doesn't suit sheep. It may look semi-arid but some of it is the best cattle country in the world. I remember in the early 80's seeing some of that further out country for the first time. In SW Qld. driving through Nockatunga Station, I remember wondering how you could ever make a go of that country. As we drove on, a huge mob of bullocks were heading back from watering at the Wilson River and they were in prime condition ready for the butcher. I asked a local about it and he explained that although sparse, the native grasses were very high in protein.

 

Those were the days before Packer brought the place and introduced yaks from the NT, and it was one of the best Hereford herds around. Another advantage of that country is that it's not too hard to get organic beef accreditation to fill a grass fed organic niche market. That was a big factor in the cotton plan on the Cooper getting knocked back. Apart from water issues, neighbouring properties risked losing their organic status.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Coles and Woolies will make it pay. If they buy synthetic meat at low prices and force the pric of real meat ay down, they will control the market. get rid of graziers and bring in the laboratories.

We have seen what happens with all the other food, such as bread. It is impossible to buy real bread nowadays. Just look at the list of ingredients. Real bread has only, flour,water, salt and yeast, or if sourdough it has no yeast.

Even meat is now produced using some terrible things such as  meat waste fed to cattle.

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Don't mention the price of meat. At Woolies butchers counter last night and they had wagyu beef $57-00 per kilo. Who can afford that? I feed a family of four for 2 days for that!

 

On a somewhat related note, my daughter saw some Streets Cornetto icecreams in the supermarket the other day, marked Vegan, made with soy. On a whim she thought she would try a pack. They weren't bad at all. quite acceptable.

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It ain't ice cream without cream

Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Standard 2.5.6 – Ice cream

 

 Requirement for food sold as ice cream

                            A food that is sold as ‘ice cream’ must:

                            (a)      be ice cream; and

                            (b)      contain no less than:       

                                      (i)       100 g/kg of milk fat; and

                                      (ii)      168 g/L of food solids.

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20 hours ago, Yenn said:

Even meat is now produced using some terrible things such as  meat waste fed to cattle.

I thought that was illegal due to Mad Cow Disease. Or is it only with pigs. You're not allowed to feed pigs swill. ie: food scraps because of it.

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