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Solid State batteries a little closer, thanks to Samsungs new technology


onetrack
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Toyota reckoned they were going to display their latest advances in SS battery technology at the 2020 Japanese Olympics opening. Now that that's well and truly been put back to next year, I don't know what Toyota have planned, now.

 

But meantimes, Samsung have got the jump on the other SS battery developers, by producing an SS battery with a thin Silver-Carbon composite as the battery anode.

 

This new design apparently reduces dendrite buildup, improves battery life and output, reduces the battery volume (for comparable output), and improves Lithium battery safety levels.

 

The gains are substantial, they are talking an 800km range for EV's, and 1000 cycles for recharge life. Long-term testing has yet to confirm the improvements, the battery is still at the "prototype" stage, but Samsung seem pretty confident they're on a winner.

 

https://news.samsung.com/global/samsung-presents-groundbreaking-all-solid-state-battery-technology-to-nature-energy

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Spacey - That has always been they way... Remember when colour TVs came out... I was in grade 5 or 6 and they were, from memory, around $500 then!! How much are they now, even with all the new fangled LED tech? About $500 - some 45 years later...

 

But this new tech sounds like the silver-carbon bullet for EVs.. Pipestrel will be very happy...

 

Mind you, I don't want to be around when one blows.. all that energy density will hurt.. (unless the battery is nearly flat).

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Spacey - That has always been they way... Remember when colour TVs came out... I was in grade 5 or 6 and they were, from memory, around $500 then!! How much are they now, even with all the new fangled LED tech? About $500 - some 45 years later...

 

But this new tech sounds like the silver-carbon bullet for EVs.. Pipestrel will be very happy...

 

Mind you, I don't want to be around when one blows.. all that energy density will hurt.. (unless the battery is nearly flat).

I saw one of Australia's first plasma screens in Adelaide, must have been almost 25 years ago. The asking price was $40,000.

Now a decent size flatscreen can be had for a couple hundred bucks.

 

I hope Samsung have made a breakthrough in battery tech - if EV's can get the same or better range as IC and they can make the price point similar, game over for petrol.

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It will be a long - long time before I hookup the caravan with a thousand k,s range electric vehicle.

Most long haul caravaner,s have long rande tanks in their trucks.

My neighbor over the rond is putting a 200 litre tank in his mobile home, he,s building.

spacesailor

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I doubt that EVs will fully eliminate the IC in Australia for a long time to come. It's not the technology, it's the availability of "refueling" points. EVs could supplant the IC in urban areas, and within their close proximity. A major disincentive to EVs for long distance travel is the time it takes to fully re-energize the storage. How long does it take to refuel an IC car? How long to re-energize an EC? In urban areas, the re-energizing can be done when the vehicle is not needed, but imagine driving from Melbourne to the Gold Coast and having to spend hours at the half-way point re-energizing an EV.

 

I must add a rider to my comment. This is written in 2020. People are hard at work trying to solve the problem of fast charging. They'll do it one day.

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I don't think recharching is going to be that great an issue with a decent range. Say you can get 800km off one charge - that is a lot of driving in one day. Plug it in overnight and you are ready for another day's driving. A friend of mine has a model S which he says is good for about 300 miles. Has never had to charge it during the day.

 

Over 'ere the goverment subsidises the installation of chargjing points into your common mamp post (metal ones).

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You could probably "induce" a charge while you are driving along a section of road..Nev

I think they've tried that - it can be done but prohibitively expensive right now.

 

Another way to do it on certain fenced-off sections of freeway would be to have a live channel in the middle of each lane and EV's could have retractable "tail hooks" which could drop down into them, tram-like. If you had a few k's of that then the car should be able to pick up a pretty good charge.

And, being out in the middle of nowhere, the rails could be powered by solar farms.

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If you think Tramlines, then why call them " lightrail " .

The rails line, fot our trains are nowhere enough for our big distances.

Just imagine electric rail Brisbane ,Sydney to Melbourne ,

One day in the Far future we may get ELECTRIC trains in Australia.

spacesailor

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One of my jobs once was to design rail track for battery powered trains in an underground mine. They were quite common. The track always ran downhill to the shaft at a grade between 1 in 50 and 1 in 100, so the loaded trains were always travelling downhill and the empty trains went up hill back out into the mine. They used lead acid batteries and could operate for about six hours before recharging.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 24/05/2020 at 8:49 AM, old man emu said:

I doubt that EVs will fully eliminate the IC in Australia for a long time to come. It's not the technology, it's the availability of "refueling" points. EVs could supplant the IC in urban areas, and within their close proximity. A major disincentive to EVs for long distance travel is the time it takes to fully re-energize the storage. How long does it take to refuel an IC car? How long to re-energize an EC? In urban areas, the re-energizing can be done when the vehicle is not needed, but imagine driving from Melbourne to the Gold Coast and having to spend hours at the half-way point re-energizing an EV.

 

I must add a rider to my comment. This is written in 2020. People are hard at work trying to solve the problem of fast charging. They'll do it one day.

 

 

Just like gas bottles, they will offer a swap service. It could be as quick as refilling with petrol.

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The battery swap business will just become a big part of servos in the future, as fossil fuel use decreases.

 

No-one even gives that gas bottle swap system a second thought today, yet it was all doom and gloom when it was introduced.

 

People complained they would get a nearly-expired bottle in exchange for their new bottle, but the gas refillers just ensure they are always current.

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One-track, don't expect an 'in date' gas bottle from swap and go.

I've seen out of date bottles. I think they claim to test every bottle that comes through.they give them a squirt of grey paint but don't stamp them. I've never had an out of date buttle rejected at a 'Swap and Go' retailer.

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I have to admit, the checking process for ensuring that gas tanks and bottles are current is pretty weak, and almost non-existent in many places.

And I just got two forklift steel gas bottles re-stamped (good for another 10 years) - not because I was worried about their currency (they'd expired many years ago), but because the tap glands were leaking gas.

You can't buy any parts for the taps, and officially, you can't work on gas bottles unless you're licenced. So I had no choice but to take them to a licenced gas installer to have them reconditioned.

He slugged me $737 to recondition both bottles - but surprisingly, to me - he only replaced the taps, didn't replace any other seals or fittings, and didn't even bother to paint them!

I thought I would've at least got a fancy paint job for the rip-off! He did refill them with gas, though, so I guess I got something a little extra for the shafting.

The reason I had these bottles reconditioned is because the steel gas bottles are particularly well built and durable, as compared to the aluminium bottles you get now, when you buy new gas bottles. And the new aluminium gas bottles for forklifts are over $450 each, so I did save a bit.

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Pete, I don't own a Range Rover, I drove up in my workhorse 2WD Hilux tray back. It comes back to the fact that LPG fixers/installers are on their deathbeds, they have about 10% of the work they had 10 years ago, and LPG industrial vehicles, and a few remaining LPG taxis, are about all they have to rely on for their income. 

 

What is peeing me off at present, is that first, the seal on the coupling leaked gas - and he claimed he's never, ever, had to replace one. So he didn't replace them on my bottles.

I will give him this, he had none of the seals in stock, reckoned he never carried them - but he did pull a seal out of a new coupler and gave it to me to help me out.

He reckoned he'd order some coupling seals in, and they'd be here next week.

 

Now, tonight, I could smell leaking gas again. I grabbed my bottle of Spray and Wipe and squirted it all over the tap, the couplings, and all the fittings - and lo and behold, the new safety valve he fitted, is leaking!!

So I'll be back to see him again this week, and we'll see what he reckons about a new gas valve leaking! Probably being sourced from China today.

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