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Easter Hat Parades are PC


old man emu
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This week there will be a lot of hooha about schools having, or not having, Easter Hat Parades. The hooha will be based on the allegation that the inclusion of the word "Easter" implies that the creation of new hats at this time of the year has Christian overtones.

 

Anyone who proposes that a hat parade forms some part of the Christian belief system, and therefore would be offensive to non-Christians is erecting a neon sign over their own ignorance.

 

Easter always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. Easter falls in close proximity to another key point in the solar year: the vernal equinox (around March 20), when there are equal periods of light and darkness. For those in northern latitudes, the coming of spring is often met with excitement, as it means an end to the cold days of winter. Spring also means the coming back to life of plants and trees that have been dormant for winter, as well as the birth of new life in the animal world. The naming of the celebration as “Easter” seems to go back to the name of a pre-Christian goddess in England, Eostre, who was celebrated at beginning of spring. The only reference to this goddess comes from the writings of the Venerable Bede, a British monk who lived in the late seventh and early eighth century. Bede wrote that the month in which English Christians were celebrating the resurrection of Jesus had been called Eosturmonath in Old English, referring to a goddess named Eostre.

 

The tradition of buying new clothes for Easter is one that was followed for decades in America, and perhaps centuries in Europe. In fact, Easter spending on outfits is the second largest holiday expense, according to the a survey by the US National Retail Federation in 2014, second only to the money spent on groceries or meals out.

 

Originating among German Lutherans, the "Easter Hare" originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behavior at the start of the season of Eastertide. The custom was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau's De ovis paschalibus ('About Easter Eggs') in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter eggs for the children. The idea of an egg-giving hare went to the U.S. in the 18th century. Protestant German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the "Osterhase" (sometimes spelled "Oschter Haws"). Hase means "hare", not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the "Easter Bunny" indeed is a hare. The hare is an untameable animal, so to make it acceptable to children, the bunny took its place.

 

Eggs, like rabbits and hares, are fertility symbols. Orthodox churches have a custom of abstaining from eggs during the fast of Lent. The only way to keep them from being wasted was to boil or roast them, and begin eating them to break the fast. The Ukrainian art of decorating eggs for Easter, known as pysanky, dates to ancient, pre-Christian times. Similar variants of this form of artwork are seen amongst other eastern and central European cultures. Those cultures are heavily influenced by Islamic culture as a result of the Ottoman periods of their histories.

 

So, a pre-Abrahamic (ie before Jews, Christians and Islamists) celebration revolving around the regeneration of life in countries of the European continent has been held since mankind was still hunting and gathering. So how can the making of brightly coloured hats and the carrying of painted eggs not be PC?

 

Old Man Emu

 

 

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I wish I was brave enough to say that to my daughters!

 

They'd probably never talk to me again.

 

As it is, they are convinced that I'm doomed to eternal damnation.

 

If they do happen to be right about that, at least I'll be among friends.

 

 

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AgreeMost of Christian celebrations, are taken from Pagan festivities.

 

spacesailor

I think all of them are.

 

Have a read of "Ghost Empire" by Richard Fidler (he of Doug Anthony All Stars fame). It's a history of Constantinople (Istanbul) - from where the christians were a minor cult, until they became the dominant religion in the Roman Empire, and then their downfall to the Ottoman Empire.

 

He really brings the history to life.

 

 

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That goddess Eostre was also involved in futility. She discovered eostregen. The other forgotten god Testra was the male equivalent and is much celebrated by the churches, especially those in the hierarchy with access to kiddies.

 

 

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According to the old testament,in Leviticus, they can be a good food source when you are being besieged. and THAT book is the ABSOLUTE word of god. So there you have it. Kids are good for YOU. and can be enjoyed and useful. and confound your enemies at the same time. It's ALL there boys and girls.. Nev

 

 

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According to the old testament,in Leviticus, they can be a good food source when you are being besieged. and THAT book is the ABSOLUTE word of god. So there you have it. Kids are good for YOU. and can be enjoyed and useful. and confound your enemies at the same time. It's ALL there boys and girls.. Nev

Ah, Leviticus. Isn't that the one that also tells you that you should kill someone who's gay or plays football (touching the skin of a pig on the sabbath or something).

 

Oh, and you can't eat octopus, scallops, crab or any other crustacean, you can't plow your field right up to the edge, wear cotton/polyester blends, sell your house, or get down and dirty with your neighbour's wife.

 

Here's a list... 76 Things Banned in Leviticus

 

These old prophets had no mental issues at all...

 

 

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