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  • 1 month later...

That powered lifesaver would be superb for saving people washed off the rocks by unexpected big waves along our Southerly shores. About 5 or 6 times a year, someone gets washed off the rocks along the SW or S coasts of W.A.

They're nearly always fishing and never take any precautions against being washed in. Then suddenly - BAM! - a big wave grabs them and they're gone. There's generally no chance of anyone saving them. The seas are like a washing machine.

 

Lifebuoys have been placed in various positions along the coast where the risk is greatest - but they're nearly always stolen or vandalised. If anyone jumps in to try to save the person washed in, they often drown, too.

Emergency services with boats, jetskis or a chopper or aircraft, are generally too late on the scene. One of these powered lifesavers on hand where people are on the rocks close to the waves, would almost certainly save anyone washed in.

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7 hours ago, onetrack said:

About 5 or 6 times a year, someone gets washed off the rocks along the SW or S coasts of W.A.

Similarly in New South Wales. But have you ever noticed that a lot of those victims are of Asian backgrounds? If there's one thing the old Aussie culture teaches is that this is a dangerous place for the unwary, no matter what outdoor pursuit you are following.

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Plenty of Australians are not water safe now, either.. Even experienced rock fishermen get caught by the BIG freak wave that comes from nowhere., rolls over them and they go into the boiling sea near rocks where you cannot  get back out of the water and will get severely injured if you try.   You have to get to  a sheltered piece of sand which may be  half a Km away or more.  Nev

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It sounds stupid, but the best way to save yourself is to swim away from the shore to where the movement of the surface water is simply the up and down of the swell, then swim parallel to the swell until it is possible to find a quieter place to land. 

 

This plan requires that the method is implanted in the brain before approaching the rocks from the land side, and the ability to be able to swim at least 50 metres by any stroke. Once away from the breaking swell, all you have to do is float until rescue arrives. 

 

The destroyer of the plan is the fear of being in the water.

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That's particularly  the case when there's a RIP.. You can expend all your energy trying to overcome it or go with it and come back to shore at a better place.  From about age 6,  I virtually lived on a surf beach. COOKS HILL at Newcastle..  I saved one of my own kids who got caught in a rip at Port Stephens at a Surf beach. He was headed for New Zealand at a great rate of knots. Nev

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Sharks will generally hunt at dawn and dusk and at night, but like many predators will feed at any time they come across prey unless they have just eaten. Some female sharks like the female Grey Nurse Sharks do not eat at all during mating season. By the end of the season you have either a very slim young Nurse, or a very angry old Matron.

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My wife and I went into the water at Catherine Hill Bay, near Newcastle, leaving two little kids sitting on a towel. Next thing we were out of our depth and going out at a great pace. neither off us was a strong swimmer. My wife was rescued by someone from the beach. I managed to swim across the rip towards rocks with people on them. They at first thought I was fooling around, but eventually came to my aid.

We could have both drowned, leaving orphans. I panicked until I realised that panick was not the way to go and gave up trying to return to the beach and swam across the rip.

Since that day I have been aware of the terrible effect panick can have on our decision makiing process.

We made sure that those two little kids could swim well as they grew up. Just so they could jump in and save us if necessary. Sadly there is less emphasis put on swimming with todays kids.

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Totally agree, Yenn. Everyone should be a strong swimmer, especially inland, where the water is less bouyant, hides nasty surprises and claims too many lives.

 

As a kid, my wife nearly drowned in a creek. This was probably her motivation for helping mobs of kids with their water confidance. She is especially good with terrified little tots who are sent to her by other teachers. She also likes teaching older non-swimmers- there are lots more of them than you’d think.

 

Although she coached our local club kids for yonks, none of them ever got very far in competition because our pool is closed most of the year. She’s made up for it by travelling widely to help other coaches and officiate at national and international events. She has met many of our greatest olympians, but for every one of them, there are thousands of kids who didn’t make it, after years spent following that black line.

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