Jump to content

Saving Private Ryan's equipment


old man emu
 Share

Recommended Posts

In the real war, there were several groups like in that movie. Some had dogs, and their casualty rate was about half. The dogs ranged out ahead and sniffed out germans.

My uncle at Milne bay nearly died from a sniper up a tree, and a dog would have prevented this. Alas, our generals etc were not smart enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

The dogs ranged out ahead and sniffed out germans…

A fascinating story is told of Churchill arriving at a forward headquarters, very soon after the Normandy landing. He paused  as he walked from his car thru the garden of the large manor house and claimed he could smell Germans. The officers with him dismissed this idea and they walked on. 
Nearby, a couple of heavily-armed Wermacht soldiers were hiding in the shrubbery, but later surrendered.

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Old Koreelah said:

A fascinating story is told of Churchill arriving at a forward headquarters, very soon after the Normandy landing. He paused  as he walked from his car thru the garden of the large manor house and claimed he could smell Germans. The officers with him dismissed this idea and they walked on. 
Nearby, a couple of heavily-armed Wermacht soldiers were hiding in the shrubbery, but later surrendered.

It was the bratwurst farts that did it.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After the Japs grabbed control of all the rubber plantations in the East Indies during 1942, new natural rubber supplies to the Allies became extremely scarce, new tyres were heavily rationed (a lot of cars were put up on blocks for several years from 1942 to 1947, due to the inability to acquire new tyres for them) - and any old tyres and rubber products were treated like gold, and they were scavenged in huge amounts, for re-use in military tyre repair and remoulding facilities - which also became huge setups.

 

The Allied tyre and rubber shortage problems didn't start to ease until the Americans started producing modest tonnages of synthetic butyl rubber in 1943. But the rubber shortage plagued the Allies all through WW2.

The fascinating story of butyl rubber is in the link below - and possibly the interesting part is that the U.S. Govt knew there would be a major rubber shortage by June 1940 - and took steps to start synthetic rubber production immediately.

 

https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/syntheticrubber/us-synthetic-rubber-program-historical-resourc.pdf

 

Even the Americans were forced onto rubber rationing, and rubber recycling -

 

http://www.sarahsundin.com/make-it-do-tire-rationing-in-world-war-ii/

 

In Australia, the re-utilisation of old rubber to assist in tyre repairs and recapping, reached major heights by 1944. The RAEME No 2 M.T. Workshops at Alice Springs had a sizeable tyre repair and recapping facility that was installed to keep up with the massive demand for tyres for the large truck convoys running from Adelaide to Darwin, on the "North-South Military Road" (now known as the Stuart Hwy).

 

These convoys were restricted to a strict 30mph (48kmh) maximum speed to conserve tyres, and in summer, long troughs of water about 200mm deep were installed at numerous places, and the trucks were driven through them on regular occasions to cool the hot tyres. I sighted photos of these cooling troughs on the AWM site years ago, now I can't find any photos of them.

 

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C197014

 

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C11510

 

https://www.awm.gov.au/advanced-search?query=tyre recapping&collection=true&facet_type=Photograph

 

 

 

 

 

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Axis nations also faced critical shortages of rubber and other resources.

Too late in the war, the Germans and Japanese started co-operating and trading, mostly using some of Japan’s massive submarines to carry cargo. When one was sunk in Atlantic, the ocean was covered in floating debris, including lots of natural rubber blocks.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanagi_missions

  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, onetrack said:

Yeah, I see it now - "rubbers". Obviously written by someone with English as their second language.

In 1986 I joined my computer class to an international electronic pen pals group. The kids laboriously typed their letters, saved them to big floppy disks, then I sent them via Telecom, OTC, at least two satellites, and an American network before they finally got to the Alaskan school. The kids quickly learned a few things, largely because they were communicating with much older and more worldly students, from mostly military families. One of my innocent young lovelies got a rush of enthusiastic replies when she posted that her hobbies included collecting rubbers.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard that in Vietnam, as a psychological warfare tactic, the Yanks airdropped thousands of massive condoms over the NVA.  Theory apparently was that penis size was a matter of some importance to the Vietnamese and if they thought the jumbo ones were what the Yanks normally wore, then it'd screw with their minds.

In my experience the Vietnamese are an extremely practical people so they probably immediately found use as water bottles, food storage etc.

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Marty_d said:

In my experience the Vietnamese are an extremely practical people…

As are their neighbours. When the Americans were trying to cut the Ho Chi Minh trail with nightly bombing raids, Lao farmers would lights small fires exactly where they wanted a new fish-pond dug. Next morning they’d find nice deep bomb craters, saving them lots of digging. Or so the story goes.

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After being up close and personal with U.S. bombing results in Vietnam, I doubt if the Americans got within 500 metres of the desired locations! - either their own desired drop points, or the Laotian farmers desired location.

I wouldn't like to be eating fish bred in bomb craters. The highly toxic chemical residues from the explosives are resistant to degradation, and the toxicity effects linger in soil and groundwater for decades.

Many a Vietnam veteran who crawled through bomb craters (which group includes myself) has suffered long-term chemical exposure effects from the explosive residues. 

 

https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/21/9002/pdf

  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps I should be more specific. Hackworth said IIRC,

That Australian gunners were much more accurate than their US counterparts and he didn't like losing his men to 'friendy fire'.....

 

BTW 'friendly fire' must be the ultimate oxymoron. There's nothing friendly about being killed, no matter who does it.

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...