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Use the right data to solve a problem.


old man emu
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A thousand pardons, saheb! It was simply meant as an aviation-related example of barking up the wrong tree.

 

This video illustrates how the raw data can lead to misinterpretation of the theory i.e., that the armour is needed where the battle damage is located, when, in fact, battle damage in the areas shown may not destroy the aircraft.

 

 

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My favourite example of survivorship bias is the story of dolphins pushing drowning sailors to shore. There are many recorded examples of this behaviour and it has been researched. The conclusion was that dolphins like pushing things in the water. They will push them in any direction. The sailors pushed further out to sea are not in the database.

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8 hours ago, old man emu said:

A thousand pardons, saheb! It was simply meant as an aviation-related example of barking up the wrong tree.

 

This video illustrates how the raw data can lead to misinterpretation of the theory i.e., that the armour is needed where the battle damage is located, when, in fact, battle damage in the areas shown may not destroy the aircraft.

 

 

I did suspect that to be the case when I saw the even distribution of bullet holes across pretty much every part of the plane except engines, cockpit and just before the HS.

Otherwise it was just that they had a "gentleman's agreement" not to shoot the plane anywhere that could cause it to crash...

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