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Windows 11 is coming later this year


onetrack
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I just got an email from MS that is a glitzy preview of the new Windows 11, that is going to be released later this year. However, I don't know that I'll be rushing to line up, like the slavering buyers are lining up, for the 300 Series Landcruiser. 

 

Windows 10 is disliked by many, I find it a right PIA, and I don't have it on any of my devices. I mostly use what I thought was a fairly-high-powered desktop (i7-3770 Intel CPU) with a 22" screen, that I built myself around 2017 (I build all my own desktops, and have done, since about 2003).

 

But now I find the i7-3770 CPU is totally obsolete and "discontinued" - I'm running a dinosaur, apparently - and what's worse, I'm running a 32 bit version, and still using Windows 7 - which I find is very user-friendly.

 

However, all that has been left in the dust of Windows 11 - which now requires a 1GHz CPU running on 64 bits only. Talk about short-life componentry, the electronics industry is incredible, in the way that products are obsolete within a year of buying them!

 

https://www.microsoft.com/en-au/windows/windows-11?ocid=eml_sv_cons_win_awr_announce_50298_25093_2509310_en-au_HER-B&zuid=107752E1F9D8240BEB185D3ADAC78A04D0

 

 

Edited by onetrack
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55 minutes ago, onetrack said:

But now I find the i7-3770 CPU is totally obsolete and "discontinued" - I'm running a dinosaur, apparently - and what's worse, I'm running a 32 bit version, and still using Windows 7 - which I find is very user-friendly.

Considering you built your computer yourself, why don't you try a linux distro. Linux is the most advanced computing system on the planet, in fact virtually all computing on and off the planet is a unix/linux system and it runs everything except windows desktops. Android is a linux base distro, as is apple systems, just about all servers on the planet are lixun based because its' free, state of the art, stable and extremely safe.

 

I still run some 32bit computers,, they all have fully up to date distros which are way ahead of windows crap and all the software and apps, are free. When you look at CGG in movies and TV, you're most probably looking at linux. I run a media production system which is used by the top studios around the planet, all free. You own your linux system no one can get into it and just about all of them still run on a 1gig of ram. I have a laptop that's just over 20 years old, it still runs a linux system which is fast and up to date.

 

Sorry don't want to hijack your thread, but thought you may like to know what real computing is about, compared to last century bloatware.😁

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My laptop was a Christmas present from my kids, bought as a discount at a demo clearance at JB. Windows 10 was pre-installed. On my old PC I had Win7 and upgraded to 8, then 10 when they came out. Before I retired, my work's computers were Windows based so I have a long history with Windows.  Apart from my browser, Brave, and Chrome for a couple of websites not compatible with Brave, the only software I use is PhotoScape photo editor, which is free and does everything I need.

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I thought about going to Linux mainly because Microsoft is a pain. It seems to suddenly decide to update and gigs of download are used. The reason I am still with Microsoft is because I cannot seem to find out how to download the Linux.

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My two  employers (large tech businesses) both used windows for all office work. But they never adopted the latest version, knowing that Mk 1 software always has bugs and vulnerabilities. They used unix and linux for servers.

 

I'm a convert to linux and apart from it's speed (it's faster to do things), it suits my older laptops.

At first it took me a little while to adapt to it's idiosyncracies, but wasn't as difficult as adjusting to a new windoze operating system. Now I have trouble when I'm forced to do something on windows (a few programmes work only on win)

 

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14 hours ago, Yenn said:

I thought about going to Linux mainly because Microsoft is a pain. It seems to suddenly decide to update and gigs of download are used. The reason I am still with Microsoft is because I cannot seem to find out how to download the Linux.

Here's a link to one the most popular linux distros mint, which is easy to use. The thing with linux, is you have hundreds of distros to choose from, just depends on what your interests are. I use mint, Ubuntu studio, puppy linux and Kali. Also a link to distro watch, which gives you run downs on most linux distros.

 

Down loading is easy, just follow the instructions and try it out live without installing it. If you want to use specific windows programs you can't find a replacement for in linux, you use "Wine/play on linux", which allows you to install and use windows programs.

 

Updates for linux, are done in the background whilst you keep working and don't interfere with what you are doing, even if you are using a program that's upgrading and you can choose to upgrade or not. The biggest upgrades would never go much beyond 100mb and the only time you have to reboot, is when there is a kernel upgrade and you can download those and not reboot until you turn of the computer.

 

https://linuxmint.com/

 

https://distrowatch.com/

 

 

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There are many flavours of Unix. Ubuntu is pretty popular along with Mint and there are many light versions as well.

 

When I retired as an IT manager in 2005 I was given a top of the range Dell Latitude D610 laptop with 500 MB of RAM & 40 GB hard drive running the latest Windows XP. Fast forward 15 years and it can't do anything as everything has moved on, even Email.

 

I was given a 1 GB RAM chip so I now had 1.5GB & installed Lubuntu the light version of Ubuntu Linux. The machine is now really fast after a full reformat & disk partition before installation. There is freeware software for everything, printer drivers, WiFi, Bluetooth etc. There is a bit of tech stuff as you need to modify bits of code here and there but so long as you have a browser you can find out how to do it all on line & Lubuntu runs Firefox better than Windows ever has.

 

 

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