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Who wrote "Hamlet"?


old man emu
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In 2012, the popular English archaeologically themed series Time Team presented a special episode entitled "Searching for Shakespeares' House." The episode followed the Team members as they excavated the grounds of Shakespeare's house, New Place, in Stratford-on-Avon. The episode purported to say that the whole of the site could not be excavated within the tree-day limit set for the activity. However, as a result of the anger of some person within the production company at the cancellation of the series after twenty successful years, previously unreleased video has now been released.

 

The video shows the excavation of a large pit located at the distant end of the New House property. Excavators were initially shocked at what they found. The pit was filled with approximately 1000 small skeletons, indicating a body height approximately equal to a 5-year-old child. Were Shakespeare and his household homicidal paedophiles?

 

Examination of the skeletons revealed that all were of a variety of monkey, known to Elizabethans in Shakespeare's time. The mystery deepened when it was discovered that the hands of each skeleton were stained with a sooty black material, and that the outside edges of the wrists were worn smooth- a sign of persistent rubbing. Were these monkeys restrained by something similar to wrist cuffs? The black material was subjected to intensive examination, and spectrographic analysis indicated that it was composed of materials known to be used in 15th Century inks. The discovery of the remnants of several sharpened goose quills within the pit further deepened an already intriguing mystery.

 

The video ends with host, Sir Tony Robinson, saying quizzically to the camera, "A thousand monkeys, with a thousand quills ...?"

 

 

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Regretfully, I regarded Shakespeare in my school days as being built up above the reality of his " skills and Impact" (Not being a very trusting soul.).. So I missed out on a lot, only doing what I had to at the time. Being more of a technocrat than a wordsmith I never made up for it, subsequently.. Nev

 

 

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It was a terrible cruel world they lived in. I'm still haunted by the "finger of birth-strangled babe, ditch delivered by a s##t". A servant-girl, unable to refuse the noblemen of the house, thrown out into the cold for getting pregnant, is what I imagined even as a schoolboy.

 

 

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Dickens is absolutely depressing to read. They must have lived pretty badly. Nev

In fact, conditions for the lower classes between 1810 and 1850 in London were pretty bad. Low wages, insecurity of employment, overcrowding of living space were all features of those time. Dickens' early writings followed the dictum "Write what you know about".

 

David Copperfield is regarded by many as a veiled autobiography of Dickens. The scenes of interminable court cases and legal arguments in Bleak House reflect Dickens's experiences as a law clerk and court reporter, and in particular his direct experience of the law's procedural delay during 1844 when he sued publishers in Chancery for breach of copyright.[143] Dickens's father was sent to prison for debt, and this became a common theme in many of his books, with the detailed depiction of life in the Marshalsea prison in Little Dorrit resulting from Dickens's own experiences of the institution

 

 

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