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Strewth the spelling of English is weird!


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A story related to me by a farmer about an Italian POW bloke being taught English, is supposedly true, because it happened amongst a family of his close relations - and I had no reason to doubt him. 

One Italian POW spent much of the war working on a nearby farm- the menfolk were away fighting a much more dedicated enemy. After the war he came back and established a successful business and br

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I know that! But if English is not your first language and you are reading it, you could be confused.

 

Like the post I saw on fb. "Sewers wanted". You had to red the context.

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Another one often misspelled is 'plat' for 'plait'. - I will plat (plait) my hair. Which is weird when it becomes 'platted'.

 

And 'plad' for 'plaid'. She wore a plad (plaid) skirt.

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Plait etymology: late 14c., pleit, "a fold, a crease, a flattened gather made by doubling cloth or similar fabric in narrow strips upon itself," also "interlaced strands of hair," from Anglo-French pleit, Old French ploit, earlier pleit, "fold, manner of folding," from Latin plicatus, past participle of plicare "to lay, fold, twist" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

 

Plat etymology: flat piece of ground," mid-15c. (mid-13c. in surnames), a variant of plot (n.) assimilated to Middle English plat (adj.) "flat," which is from Old French plat "flat, stretched out" as in "plateau"

 

"PLAD" is not a recognised word. It is a medical acronym that we would meet as Posterior Lip Augmentation Device (hip surgery)

 

Plaid  etymology: 1510s, "garment consisting of a long piece of woollen cloth, often having a tartan pattern, traditionally worn in Scotland," from Scottish, from or related to Gaelic plaide "blanket, mantle,".  The meaning "a pattern of bars crossing each other at right angles" is by 1890. As an adjective, "ornamented with a pattern of bars or stripes of colour crossing one another at right angles," c. 1600, from the noun.

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1 hour ago, pmccarthy said:

Plat in mining is the access to the shaft on each level

That means that it is jargon and only has meaning in a specific area. It wouldn't have meaning in an open cut mine, would it?

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One thing that gets right up my nose today, is the constant reference to "draws" - when the word should be spelt "drawers".

This is so prevalent - in advertising, signage, and a hundred other places - that I'm sure the generations under 50 have never learnt what the correct spelling actually is.

 

Edited by onetrack
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2 hours ago, old man emu said:

That means that it is jargon and only has meaning in a specific area. It wouldn't have meaning in an open cut mine, would it?

Agreed. I think it is Cornish. With words like winze, flucan etc.

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winze: a ventilation shaft between levels. the word appears to be a corruption of "winds" as in air movement.

 

flucan:  Cornish term for a wide fault-gouge zone filled with decomposed mineral matter, described by Silliman and Whitney (1855) as a talco-micaceous slate that was completely disintegrated such that no blasting was required, as it ran easily.

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Not so much "spelling", but wrong word usage is another characteristic which seems to be on the increase, particlarly with social media (fb) users, but also creeping into this forum.

 

One of the instances to which I refer is 'to' instead of 'too' - "to much to drink" instead of "too much to drink" .

 

Another is 'of' instead of 'have' - "I could of gone with you" instead of "I could have gone with you".

 

(Now I'll have O.M.E. dragging out the dictionary again.)

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And another. "Alot" when they mean "a lot". Alot of people getting their Covid jabs."

 

It should be "A lot of people..."

 

From Grammarly.com:

 

What Does a Lot Mean?


Alot is a common misspelling of a lot. A lot should always be spelled as two words. The meaning of a lot depends on the context. Usually, it means “many” or “to a great extent.” Let’s look at some examples.

 

Correct:   Shelley reads a lot of books during her morning commute.
Incorrect: Chopped parsley looks alot like chopped cilantro.

 

These are not to be confused with "Allot"

 

Again from Grammarly.com:

 

What Does Allot Mean?


To allot means to apportion by shares or to set aside for a special purpose. How do you use this verb? Let’s look at some examples of allot in a sentence.

 

Example:   The settlers were alloted one acre of farmland.
Example:   The employer allots one hour for lunch.

Example:   We will allot tickets to members first, then to general public.

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1 hour ago, red750 said:

(Now I'll have O.M.E. dragging out the dictionary again.)

Wasn't me. I didn't do it. No one saw me!

 

If I had, I coulda been a contender!

 

This shows how spelling reflects pronunciation, as it was before spelling became standardised due to the printing press and later by the creation of dictionaries and spelling books. 

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But No answer to my spelling question. 

Now it,s All breaking down !.

Even our neighbors over the pond Want their own language. ( Aotearoa ), 

NOW

The prince of the Welsh principality, is the English Prince Charles.

WHEN

Prince Charles becomes KING !  Does his principality become !.

The KINGDOM of WALES .

spacesailor

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Hey, that reminds me of a joke.

 

An Aussie walks into a bar and hears two largish ladies speaking in an accent.

 

"Excuse me", he says, "but are you girls from Scotland?"

 

One of them turns around and snarls "It's 'Wales', you idiot, 'Wales'!"

 

"Oh, I'm sorry," he says, "Are you whales from Scotland?"

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