Jump to content

Space Stations: Past, Present, And Future


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 301
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The SpaceX test astronauts have landed safely. There didn't seem to be much media attention leading up to it compared with the launch.

It would be good to live for another 100 years to see how it all pans out. I find the space travel thing incredibly exciting. Imagine what we could do if we took all the money, talent and energy we us

Posted Images

10 hours ago, nomadpete said:

I really admire these incredible space achievements. 

But why, when we have all this precision available through modern technology, why, oh why can't they put a shredder or robovac on the front of these spacecraft. Solving the problem of avoiding space trash.

Maybe a compactor. Squash it all into a big block, strap on a couple of rockets and send it off to another solar system.

  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, willedoo said:

Maybe a compactor. Squash it all into a big block, strap on a couple of rockets and send it off to another solar system.

Better still, collect it up and re-use it in space construction.
It cost squillions to get materials into orbit, so why waste it?

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/07/2021 at 9:38 PM, Old Koreelah said:

Better still, collect it up and re-use it in space construction.
It cost squillions to get materials into orbit, so why waste it?

I wonder if they could invent a space machine that sucks it in, turns it into a suitable medium and then uses that material to 3D print things.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

The Russians are putting up their own Hubble. The Spektr-UV will be a space based UV telescope, planned for launch in October 2025. It will be built by Lavochkin of former aeroplane fame, and funding of equivalent 50 mllion USD has been allocated. sounds cheap when compared to the launch cost.

 

The other telescope announced is a ground-based optical laser system to observe satellites. It will also be able to determine what kind of equipment is on foreign satellites and detect space debris that threatens domestic equipment in orbit. Far away from space, this year they launched an underwater telescope in Lake Baikal to detect high-energy cosmic particles.

  • Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Roscosmos have said they will build a prototype reusable rocket by the end of next year. They've said that the SpaceX technology is not suitable for Russia due to the geographic location of the Vostochny spaceport in the far east and the resulting lack of a suitable area for recovery. It will be developed by the Myasishchev Design Bureau of ex bomber fame. It's proposed that the rocket's first stage will deploy a wing and switch on a rocket engine at a designated altitude to assist in recovery. Sounds like they intend to fly it to a suitable landing spot.

  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The TASS Russian News Agency will be the first of all global mass media outlets to open a permanent bureau on the International Space Station. The first TASS correspondent onboard the orbital outpost will be Hero of Russia, cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin. Reporting on daily routine, his reports will be available to the agency’s readership from TASS news resources and his photo and video contributions will be uploaded to the agency’s website and official pages on social media.

 

Roscosmos CEO Dmitry Rogozin has said that doing two jobs, that of a cosmonaut and a correspondent simultaneously, would not result in a conflict of interest, although all crew members working in orbit had access to sensitive information. "The cosmonauts are highly professional and know very well where to stop. I believe, there will be no conflict of interest," Rogozin assured.

 

Misurkin will head off on the Soyuz MS-20 on December 8 with his TASS correspondent’s ID, together with Japanese billionaire Yusako Maezawa and his assistant Yozo Hirano.

  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Russian Space Systems, a subsidiary of the Russian state space company Roscosmos, are working on a project to collect solar power in space and transfer it back to earth. Part A will be a 70 sq. metre unmanned spacecraft to collect the solar energy, part B is a ground station antenna array that will receive energy wirelessly from the spacecraft and distribute it. They'll be using a laser ray to transfer the energy. The spacecraft will also be able to store surplus energy and transfer it to other spacecraft if needed. A bit like a space service station.

  • Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Harvestng solar energy from space has been proposed many times, but I hope it doesn’t get developed too much; it would be adding energy that was not destined to reach our planet. Earth’s heat budget has been mucked up enough by our species.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...